Richard Linklater: Dream Is Destiny (2016) Poster

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7/10
Richard Linklater: A Tribute to a Great Austin Director
JustCuriosity13 March 2016
Dream is Destiny is an enjoyable tribute to Austin's greatest directing talent and was extremely well-received during its showing at Austin's SXSW Film Festival where Linklater is adored. It is mostly focused on showing and discussing clips from Linklater's oeuvre. The clips are enjoyable and well-chosen. The film offers some insight into Linklater's development. The interviews with him and his friends are entertaining. And yet, a film done his close friends is more of a tribute than a serious critical examination of his work. The film was co-directed by his close friend Louis Black (co-founder of SXSW and the Austin Chronicle). Almost by definition it lacks the critical depth needed for serious documentary filmmaking. It is informative and entertaining, but more nostalgic than really in-depth. It skips over his weaker films and focuses on his more iconic works. It also chronicles some of the changes in Austin, TX and the Austin film scene that has grown up around him. It is certainly a good introduction to his work for those who aren't familiar and provides a nice walk down memory lane for fans. Still, a much better documentary could be made about Linklater and his works.
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Interesting Look at an Interesting Filmmaker
Michael_Elliott30 March 2017
Richard Linklater: Dream Is Destiny (2016)

*** 1/2 (out of 4)

The career of Richard Linklater is discussed as we get to hear from the man himself as well as those who have worked with him and there are even a few critics on hand. The documentary basically covers everything from SLACKERS to the making of BOYHOOD and the production of EVERYBODY WANTS SOME.

If you're a fan of LInklater then you'll certainly enjoy this documentary and especially the comments from the man himself. He relives some of his earlier movies and is constantly talking about his fears in the business and why he has pretty much stayed away from mainstream stuff. All of his movies are discussed with the exception of THE BAD NEWS BEARS, which pretty much gets overlooked.

The best thing about this documentary is that you get to see some of the early writings of the director. Apparently he kept a journal tracking all the money he spent when he first moved to Austin and this here was pretty funny to see. There are also interviews with the likes of Ethan Hawke, Julie Delpy, Matthew McConaughey, Jack Black, Patricia Arquette, Kevin Smith and others.

Of course, Linklater probably has a lot more movies in him and I'm sure another documentary will be needed ten or twenty years from now. However, this one here is an interesting look at a very different type of filmmaker and there's no question that when you're done watching this you'll be ready to go back and watch his films again.
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7/10
Austin and Auteur Linklater
ferguson-64 August 2016
Greetings again from the darkness. He had the childhood dream of becoming a major league baseball player derailed due to a health issue. His dream of becoming a novelist fizzled because he preferred collaboration to solitude. So his dreams led to his destiny … that of being a ground-breaking filmmaker who "changed the landscape of independent filmmaking". Director Richard Linklater is profiled by co-directors Louis Black (co-founder Austin Chronicle and SXSW) and Karen Bernstein (Emmy and Grammy award winner), two passionate and knowledgeable folks who are understandably fans of Linklater and the Austin film landscape.

The film kicks off with a scene from Slacker (1991) in which Linklater himself appeared as a taxi passenger rambling philosophically about the bus station. It then time warps to the red carpet event for the premiere of Linklater's Boyhood (2014), setting the stage for filling the gap of more than two decades.

It might be best to think of this as a tribute to Linklater the filmmaker rather than an in-depth analysis of how he creates his art … though we do get to see him on set. Some of the time is spent watching Linklater and Black peruse old journals and early screenplays as the young director was honing his thoughts and talent. This type of nostalgia could be overdone, but instead it allows us to better understand the journey that has produced some outstanding work (along with a few forgettable projects).

Over the years, so much attention has been paid to the NYC vs LA preferences within the film industry; it's a pleasure to acknowledge the "outsider world" of Austin, Texas … a film scene nurtured by Linklater and his cronies. There are plenty of family photos and home videos, along with the celebrity input of Jonathan Demme, John Pierson, Kevin Smith, Matthew McConaughey, Jack Black, Ethan Hawke, Patricia Arquette, and Ellar Coltrane (the kid from Boyhood). Each speaks admiringly in regards to Linklater's spirit and passion for the work. It's especially interesting to hear of his budget/fundraising struggles on Boyhood – an understandable challenge since the project took 12 years, and required he return for funding each and every year! Richard Linklater is auteur defined. He is his work, and his work is him. He's been at the forefront of the indie wave with Slacker (1991), followed by the cult favorite Dazed and Confused (1993), the "Before" trilogy (Sunrise – 1995, Sunset – 2004, Midnight – 2013), box office hit School of Rock (2003), the oddball Bernie (2011), groundbreaking Boyhood (2014), and his most recent Everybody Wants Some! (2016). Linklater is proof that creative filmmaking can thrive in a place like Austin, Texas … even if he might still like to be a baseball player.
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