Bernie (2011) - News Poster

(2011)

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James Adomian Has Become the Podcast World’s Man of 1000 Famous Voices

As part of Podcast Week, IndieWire is taking a deeper look at some of the best podcasts of the year. For more of the top episodes of 2019, you can read our mid-year and year-end lists here and here.

Comedy podcasts tend to fall into one of two categories: ones with a living room couch vibe, featuring two or more people chatting, and those that find comedians transforming themselves into an entirely new reality. There’s definitely more of the first kind, but even rarer is the one that finds a meaningful way to combine the two.

As James Adomian, host of the Forever Dog show “The Underculture,” describes it, that’s part of how the whole idea for the show came about.

“It’s like a little director’s commentary at the end of the podcast,” Adomian told IndieWire. “Right before we started recording when I was at South by Southwest,
See full article at Indiewire »

Film fest reviews suggest ‘Judy’ could spark a Renee-asaince for its leading lady — and Zellweger’s 4th Oscar bid

  • Gold Derby
Film fest reviews suggest ‘Judy’ could spark a Renee-asaince for its leading lady — and Zellweger’s 4th Oscar bid
Remember when Renee Zellweger had Tom Cruise — and moviegoers — at “hello” in 1996’s “Jerry Maguire”? Or when she rebranded the working-girl archetype for the 21st-century in 2001’s “Bridget Jones’ Diary” and earned her first Academy Award nomination as a lead? Then there was her mastery of the art of singing, dancing and acting all at the same time as Roxie Hart, a murderous wannabe jazz-age chorine in 2002’s “Chicago,” the source of her second lead nod.

Back then, Zellweger was America’s sweetheart. But something happened after she won a supporting Oscar for her portrait of no-nonsense and self-sufficient mountain woman Ruby Thewes in 2003’s “Cold Mountain.”

Just when her career should have gone rocketing skyward, her opportunities on the big screen began to somewhat inexplicably shrink. Yes, that second Bridget Jones film in 2004 was a stinker, but at least she followed it with a sturdy stand-by-your-man role as Russell Crowe
See full article at Gold Derby »

The 7 Best Performances Richard Linklater Has Ever Directed — IndieWire Critics Survey

Every week, IndieWire asks a select handful of film critics two questions and publishes the results on Monday.

Richard Linklater’s “Where’d You Go, Bernadette” came (and went) last weekend, and while critics were mixed on the movie, few could deny the joy of Cate Blanchett’s lead performance. Across his long and eccentric career, Linklater has always been able to inspire the best from his cast.

This week’s question: What is the best performance in a Richard Linklater movie?

Jack Black (“Bernie”)

Joel Mayward (@joelmayward) Cinemayward.com

Though the “Before” films are my all-time favorite trilogy, with Delpy and Hawke giving some of the most raw and complex performances of their careers, I want to celebrate the under-appreciated wonder that is Jack Black as mortician-turned-murderer Bernie Tiede in “Bernie.” It’s the perfect role for emphasizing Black’s strengths and none of his weaknesses as he imbues Bernie with an energetic earnestness.
See full article at Indiewire »

All 21 Richard Linklater Movies Ranked, From Worst to Best (Photos)

  • The Wrap
All 21 Richard Linklater Movies Ranked, From Worst to Best (Photos)
With “Last Flag Flying” arriving in theaters, we’re taking on the not-so-simple task of ranking the movies of genre-hopping director Richard Linklater. The top titles on this list could rightfully be called modern classics, but every one of his films somehow evokes the heartfelt philosophy of his hypnotic “Waking Life”: human interaction is the highest form of spiritual communion.

20. “Bad News Bears” (2005)

The 1976 original was a true product of its time, with an all-star lineup led by Walter Matthau and Tatum O’Neal, but this unnecessary remake just felt like it was trying too hard. By 2005, the sight of an aggressively un-pc Little League coach (Billy Bob Thornton) encouraging outrageous behavior in his young team seemed less subversive than sad.

19. “Fast Food Nation” (2006)

When truth is stranger than fiction, why turn it into fiction? Linklater admirably attempted to create a multi-course meal out of Eric Schlosser’s bestselling book,
See full article at The Wrap »

Listen to an Exclusive From the ‘Where’d You Go, Bernadette’ Soundtrack

Listen to an Exclusive From the ‘Where’d You Go, Bernadette’ Soundtrack
Richard Linklater‘s Where’d You Go, Bernadette reunites the filmmaker with Graham Reynolds, a composer who provided music for Linklater’s films Before Midnight, Bernie, Last Flag Flying and more. Ahead of the film’s release next month, we’re debuting an exclusive from the Where’d You Go, Bernadette soundtrack. Hear it below. Where’d You Go Bernadette Soundtrack Lakeshore Records will release the Where’d […]

The post Listen to an Exclusive From the ‘Where’d You Go, Bernadette’ Soundtrack appeared first on /Film.
See full article at Slash Film »

‘Ghost Rider:’ Gabriel Luna to Star in Marvel-Hulu Series

  • Variety
‘Ghost Rider:’ Gabriel Luna to Star in Marvel-Hulu Series
Gabriel Luna is once again suiting up as Marvel’s Ghost Rider, but this time for Hulu.

Variety has learned exclusively that Luna will star in the recently announced Hulu series based on the comic book character. This will mark the second time that Luna has played Ghost Rider, previously appearing as the character in the ABC-Marvel series “Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.” However, sources stress that this will be a completely new iteration of the character in now way connected to the “Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.” storyline.

In addition to his time on “Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D,” Luna’s other television credits include “True Detective,” “Wicked City,” and “Matador.” On the feature side, He is set to appear in the upcoming “Terminator: Dark Fate” opposite Arnold Schwarzenegger and Linda Hamilton. He has previously appeared in films like “Bernie,” and “Balls Out.”

Luna is repped by UTA,
See full article at Variety »

‘Honor Thy Father’: Mark Harmon Options True-Crime Tale Of Texas Football Family

  • Deadline
‘Honor Thy Father’: Mark Harmon Options True-Crime Tale Of Texas Football Family
Exclusive: Mark Harmon and his Wings Productions, along with Eric Tannenbaum and the Tannenbaum Company, have optioned the rights to Honor Thy Father, a true-crime tale of murder in a Texas football family that was published by Texas Monthly as a June 1998 feature article.

Angelo Pizzo, who wrote and produced the sports-based classics Hoosiers (1986) and Rudy (1993), is on board to adapt the 7,500-word magazine article to screenplay form. Tannenbaum and Harmon will produce alongside Pizzo, with Karen Samfilippo serving as associate producer.

This is a potential starring vehicle for Harmon provided schedule can be carved out of his production commitment to NCIS, the CBS series that launched in 2003 and has featured Harmon in the role of Special Agent Leroy Jethro Gibbs in more than 370 episodes.

Bill Butterfield was described at his son’s trial as frustrated former athlete
See full article at Deadline »

Exclusive Interview – Composer Graham Reynolds talks Sister Aimee, synthesizers, and Jimi Hendrix

Red Stewart chats with Graham Reynolds about Sister Aimee….

Graham Reynolds is an American composer who has been working in the film and television industries since the early 2000s. He is best known for his scores for movies like A Scanner Darkly, Bernie, and Before Midnight.

Flickering Myth had the chance to interview him about his work on the independent drama and Sundance selection Sister Aimee, and I in turn had the honor to conduct it:

Mr. Reynolds, thank you so much for taking the time to speak with me. You’ve worked on some of my favorite movies like A Scanner Darkly.

Oh that’s awesome, yeah, very happy to.

I know it was just a couple of years ago that you said you were starting to heavily study synthesizers. You’d of course used them in your past compositions, but having done this deeper learning, have you found
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Andy Gruenberg, Longtime Film Distribution Executive, Dies at 68

  • Indiewire
Andy Gruenberg, a longtime film-distribution executive who most recently oversaw theatrical distribution for Netflix, died suddenly on January 18. He was 68.

Born in St. Paul, Minnesota on March 10, 1950, Gruenberg spent his childhood in Milwaukee and his working life in the film industry; his tenure included stints at Warner Bros., Columbia, MGM, and Miramax, where he helped bring everything from “Ghostbusters” and “The Karate Kid” to “Leaving Las Vegas” and “Life Is Beautiful” to theaters. Gruenberg was Miramax’s President of Distribution when “Shakespeare in Love” won Best Picture and Executive Vice President of Distribution at MGM when “Leaving Las Vegas” won Nicolas Cage the Academy Award for Best Actor.

Other titles whose theatrical releases he oversaw include “Get Shorty,” “Tomorrow Never Dies,” “The Proposition,” and “Bernie.”

“I loved working with Andy and enjoyed our friendship over many years,” said Ted Mundorff, who co-founded the Film Arcade with him in 2011. “Andy was
See full article at Indiewire »

Elections 2018: Tony Kaye Sets a Stuntwoman on Fire to Get Out the Vote in Texas — Watch

Elections 2018: Tony Kaye Sets a Stuntwoman on Fire to Get Out the Vote in Texas — Watch
Filmmaker Tony Kaye has always taken an incendiary approach to exposing the nation’s most disturbing problems, from the traumatizing act of anti-Semitism that opened “American History X” to his eye-opening abortion rights documentary “Lake of Fire.” While Kaye has maintained a lower profile in recent years, he continued to churn out a range of multimedia work, and the looming midterm elections have given him the opportunity to deliver bite-sized call to action.

Kaye’s new minute-long advertisement has provided exclusively to IndieWire and is currently being shared by a handful of volunteers canvassing in the state. It features Deven McNair, a professional stuntwoman, being set on fire while delivering an angry call to action. “This year, it’s more than an election. It’s an emergency,” she says. “Things are getting out of control. Republicans are giving billionaires a trillion-dollar tax cut.”

She also calls out the threats to “healthcare,
See full article at Indiewire »

Richard Linklater Ad Calls Out Ted Cruz for Not Being ‘Tough as Texas’ and Letting Trump Bully Him — Watch

Richard Linklater Ad Calls Out Ted Cruz for Not Being ‘Tough as Texas’ and Letting Trump Bully Him — Watch
Filmmaker Richard Linklater has thrown his hat into the political ring by directing a new anti-Ted Cruz advertisement. The video launched October 8 and is sponsored by the Fire Ted Cruz Pac. Texas senator Cruz is seeking re-election this November over Democrat Beto O’Rourke.

The advertisement, “Is Ted Cruz ‘Tough as Texas?,'” reunites Linklater with Sonny Carl Davis, who appeared in a small role in the director’s 2011 movie “Bernie.” Davis sits at a diner table and mocks Cruz and his “Tough as Texas” campaign slogan. “Somebody left something on my door the other day that said, ‘Ted Cruz: tough as Texas.’ If somebody called my wife a dog, and said my daddy was in on the Kennedy assassination, I wouldn’t be kissin’ their ass.”

Davis is referring to the fact that Cruz continues to support Donald Trump despite being consistently bullied by Trump when the two
See full article at Indiewire »

‘The House With a Clock in Its Walls’ Review: Thrills, Chills and Jack Black

‘The House With a Clock in Its Walls’ Review: Thrills, Chills and Jack Black
If you want to scare the kiddies but still keep them giggling, Jack Black is your man. This peerless comic actor can do more with an arched eyebrow than a crazy-car stuffed with clowns, and it’s that old Black magic that ignites The House With a Clock in Its Walls, a supernatural tale set in 1955 in New Zebedee, Michigan (a town with its very own haunted mansion). The School of Rock star plays Jonathan, the warlock who occupies the premises; when he isn’t trying to find the source
See full article at Rolling Stone »

Jack Black as Pennsylvania's Polka King in Trailer for 'The Polka King'

"I heard that people are investing money in you." Netflix has finally unveiled the official trailer for The Polka King, a film which premiered at the Sundance Film Festival this year (back in January) and will be released on Netflix just before the Sundance Film Festival next year (in early 2018). Jack Black stars as Jan Lewan, a Polish immigrant who became the "King of Pennsylvania Polka" and started a Polka Ponzi scheme. This is based on a true story and it almost seems too crazy to be real, but it is. The cast includes Jenny Slate, Jason Schwartzman, Jacki Weaver, J.B. Smoove, and Willie Garson. This reminds me of Jack Black's other good dramatic role, in Linklater's Bernie, but it's an entirely different story. I heard some solid buzz on this at Sundance, but it seems to have been forgotten until its return now. Take a look. Here's
See full article at FirstShowing.net »

Win Passes To The Advance Screening Of Last Flag Flying In St. Louis

Opening Wednesday, November 22nd is Last Flag Flying.

In 2003, 30 years after they served together in the Vietnam War, former Navy Corps medic Larry “Doc” Shepherd (Steve Carell) re-unites with Former Marines Sal Nealon (Bryan Cranston) and Reverend Richard Mueller (Laurence Fishburne) on a different type of mission: to bury Doc’s son, a young Marine killed in the Iraq War. Doc decides to forgo burial at Arlington Cemetery and, with the help of his old buddies, takes the casket on a bittersweet trip up the East Coast to his home in suburban New Hampshire. Along the way, Doc, Sal and Mueller reminisce and come to terms with shared memories of the war that continues to shape their lives.

A thoughtful and moving road movie from Oscar®-nominated director Richard Linklater (Boyhood, 2014), Last Flag Flying brims with humor, melancholy and regret as it examines the lasting effect of choices made in the crucible of war.
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

The Last Word movie review: wealthy white privilege, unchecked

MaryAnn’s quick take… Cantankerous old grump teaches directionless young people about life… in a way that is totally obnoxious and not in the least bit convincing. I’m “biast” (pro): I’m desperate for stories about women

I’m “biast” (con): nothing

(what is this about? see my critic’s minifesto)

It is not impossible to tell a story about a nasty character and make us like him or her. This is not a movie that achieves that. I will credit The Last Word, however, for flipping on its head that old cliché about a cantankerous old grump finally learning the true meaning of Christmas/life/love/whatever from a spunky young person: here, it’s cantankerous old grump Harriet (Shirley MacLaine: The Secret Life of Walter Mitty, Bernie) who teaches some timid and directionless younger people the true meanings of things… though in a way
See full article at FlickFilosopher »

The Last Word movie review: wealthy white privilege, unchecked

MaryAnn’s quick take… Cantankerous old grump teaches directionless young people about life… in a way that is totally obnoxious and not in the least bit convincing. I’m “biast” (pro): I’m desperate for stories about women

I’m “biast” (con): nothing

(what is this about? see my critic’s minifesto)

It is not impossible to tell a story about a nasty character and make us like him or her. This is not a movie that achieves that. I will credit The Last Word, however, for flipping on its head that old cliché about a cantankerous old grump finally learning the true meaning of Christmas/life/love/whatever from a spunky young person: here, it’s cantankerous old grump Harriet (Shirley MacLaine: The Secret Life of Walter Mitty, Bernie) who teaches some timid and directionless younger people the true meanings of things… though in a way
See full article at FlickFilosopher »

Movie Review – The Last Word (2017)

The Last Word, 2017.

Directed by Mark Pellington.

Starring Shirley MacLaine, Amanda Seyfried, Anne Heche and Ann’Jewel Lee.

Synopsis:

A wealthy retired businesswoman decides that her life story should be told her way and employs a local journalist to write her obituary in advance – and under her supervision. But the journalist won’t follow the script and starts to look at her client’s life in more detail, discovering some surprises along the way – and finding that perhaps her bark is worse than her bite.

The legendary Shirley MacLaine hit 90 this year and, despite the title of the film, this is not her swansong. She has several more in the pipeline, which is fortunate, as somebody with such a great and varied career deserves to go out on a high. And, sadly, The Last Word isn’t it.

She plays Harriet, a retired businesswoman whose success was down to micro managing everything.
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Review: ‘The Last Word’ is a Pleasant, Predictable Sitcom

Harriet Lauler is not a nice women. Taught to be pushy and proud in her days leading an advertising agency in a small California town that still has a daily paper, like much of the town — which also includes a hip indie radio station — she is a dying breed. Beat by beat, though, Lauler (played by the stellar Shirley MacLaine) “evolves” in Mark Pellington’s predictable dramedy The Last Word. Cinematic comfort food comes to mind, and rest assured, mom and grandma will probably have a nice time.

The story features a bit of darkness as Lauler, an intentional women whose gardener and stylist aren’t doing things to her liking (she’s proud enough to rip the clippers out of both of their hands), decides to control her death. No such luck as she overdoses, only to find the obituary of an old nemesis covered in red wine. This
See full article at The Film Stage »

Shirley MacLaine Vows to Help Films With Older Actors Succeed Commercially

Shirley MacLaine Vows to Help Films With Older Actors Succeed Commercially
Shirley MacLaine affirmed her commitment to making films about older people as she accepted a Lifetime Achievement Award at the Texas Film Awards. “I am so thrilled now at my age to be part of the independent film world,” she said. “I want to thank you for reminding me that I am not going anywhere, and anyway I would come back right away.”

In his introductory remarks, Austin-bred filmmaker Richard Linklater touted “Terms of Endearment,” “The Evening Star,” and his own more recent film, “Bernie,” as three Texas films starring MacLaine that made her “an honorary Texan.”

Read More: SXSW 2017: 13 Must-See Films At This Year’s Festival

The beloved actress opened her acceptance speech with a political joke, suggesting that Austin progressives “Should build a wall around this city.” Taking a more serious turn, the actress affirmed her commitment to making films that “serve the quadrant that is forgotten and underserved,
See full article at Indiewire »

‘Rise:’ Short Film Starring Anton Yelchin To Be Made Into a Feature — Watch the Original Here

‘Rise:’ Short Film Starring Anton Yelchin To Be Made Into a Feature — Watch the Original Here
The sci-fi short “Rise,” starring the late Anton Yelchin and directed by David Karlak, will be made into a feature. Producers Johnny Lin (“Bernie”) and Brian Oliver (“Black Swan”) —from Filmula and Cross Creek, respectively— obtained the feature rights from Warner Bros., as reported by The Hollywood Reporter.

Read More: ‘Thoroughbred’ Review: Anton Yelchin’s Final Performance Highlights Cory Finley’s Remarkable Debut

The short is based on a screenplay written by Karlak with Patrick Melton and Marcus Dunstan (the “Saw” films, “The Collector”). Here is the official description of the short film: A dystopian future, where man’s attempt to create artificial intelligence has spun wildly out of control, leading to a war between man and machine.

Read More: Martin Scorsese’s 1990 Short Documentary About Giorgio Armani is Now Streaming Online — Watch

“Brian and I are extremely excited to have an opportunity to build a film franchise based on
See full article at Indiewire »
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