Happy, Happy (2010) - News Poster

(2010)

News

Goalpost lands international partners for refugee ship drama ‘Dark Victory’

Goalpost lands international partners for refugee ship drama ‘Dark Victory’
Rosemary Blight.

Distributor All3Media International, New Zealand’s South Pacific Pictures and Norway’s Maipo Film have boarded Dark Victory, Goalpost Pictures’ political drama to be directed by Matthew Saville.

Goalpost Pictures’ Rosemary Blight and Saville pitched the project at Co-Pro Series 2020 at the Berlin International Film Festival.

Adapted by Saville from the book Dark Victory: How a Government Lied its Way to Political Triumph by David Marr and Marian Wilkinson, the five-hour drama will chronicle the story of the Howard government’s refusal in 2001 to allow Norwegian freighter Tampa to enter Christmas Island.

It will follow Captain Arne Rinnan, the master of the ship that rescued 438 Afghan refugees from their sinking boat in the middle of the Indian Ocean. The government’s refusal to give them safe passage sparked a political crisis.

All3Media International signed a first-look deal with Goalpost in 2018. The screen adaptation has been in development
See full article at IF.com.au »

Watch a Figure Skater Take Hollywood by Storm in ‘Sonja – The White Swan’ Trailer

  • Variety
Highly pedigreed Sundance alum Anne Sewitsky returns to the festival with a Hollywood bombshell story you haven’t heard.

“Sonja – The White Swan” tells the true story of acclaimed athlete and architect of modern figure skating Sonja Henie. The Norwegian celebrity traveled to Los Angeles in 1936 to embark on a film career, armed with sharp wit and ambition to spare. She would land a studio contract after only a year of knocking on show business doors, and wound up in a feature that sold the most tickets at the domestic box office in 1937. Watch the film’s trailer, exclusive to Variety, above.

Ine Marie Wilmann stars in the titular role. Sewitsky’s 2011 debut feature “Happy, Happy” won the festival’s grand jury prize in the world cinema drama category. She would return to Park City in 2015 with “Homesick,” also starring Wilmann.

The director has several projects lined up, including an
See full article at Variety »

Anne Sewitsky’s Sonja Henie Biopic Scores Pre-Sale Deals

“Sonja — The White Swan”

Figure skating is back in the news thanks to the PyeongChang Olympics and Margot Robbie-starrer “I, Tonya.” Now another controversial skater has a biopic on the way: three-time Olympic champion Sonja Henie. Variety reports that TrustNordisk has secured major pre-sales on Anne Sewitsky’s “Sonja — The White Swan.”

Known internationally for both her skating and Hollywood career — with titles including “Thin Ice” and “My Lucky Star” — Henie eventually lost her studio deal. “‘The White Swan’ depicts [Henie’s] complex relationship with her older brother Leif, who taught her how to ice skate in Oslo and was part of her life in Hollywood,” according to the source. It seems likely that the film will also address accusations that she was a Nazi, an impression held by many after she declared “Heil Hitler” in front of the man himself before skating in Berlin ahead of the 1936 Winter Olympics.

The
See full article at Women and Hollywood »

Happy, Happy Review

  • HeyUGuys
Happy Happy (or, Sykt Lykkelig, to give it its proper name), is an often hilarious snapshot of family life amongst the snowy plains of Norway. Bored with the everyday routine of marriage and lack of appreciation from husband, Erik (Joachim Rafaelsen), Kaja (Agnes Kittelsen) welcomes the change of pace and possibility of forming a friendship with the shiny, similar aged couple that move in next door. But though Sigve (Henrik Rafaelsen) and Elisabeth (Maibritt Saerens) may have a perfect exterior, they are not necessarily as happy as they would have Kaja and Erik believe.

Sweet, full of sentiment and utterly delightful, Happy Happy shows just a fraction of the lives of a very interesting and diverse set of characters. As her husband goes hunting for days at a time, Kaja is left feeling unfulfilled and unloved, relishing in time spent with her new neighbours, while her young son Theodor (Oskar
See full article at HeyUGuys »

Happy, Happy

Maja is happy. She lives a simple life with her husband Eirik and son Theodore in snowy, rural Norway, and is content with the way things are. All that changes when the new neighbors move in. Sigve and Elisabeth arrive one day with their adopted Ethiopian son, Noa, and move into the house right next door. Maja is ecstatic to have new people to interact with. But she could never have imagined how intense the relationship between the two families would become. Happy, Happy (Sykt lykkelig) is the story of a woman’s struggle to find herself, and a tale of two couples trying to regain their love.

Read more...
See full article at JustPressPlay »

Vote on the Euro Film Awards (Plus: Oscar Submits)

While I normally approve not of "people's choice" awards -- that's what box office is for -- I do find the European Film Awards a curious beast worth noting each year. They have variety by way of scattershot film culture, there being no unifying "Hollywood" to control them. This year their People's Choice Awards -- which you can vote on and enter for a chance to win a trip to the awards in Berlin -- offers up an odd collection of Camp Comedy (France's star-laden Potiche), Royalty Porn (The UK's Oscar winner The King's Speech), Meta History (Spain's Even The Rain), Message Movie (Denmark's Oscar Winner In a Better World), Neeson-y Thriller (the international Unknown), Fish Out of Water Comedy (Italy's Welcome to the South), Ensemble Drama (France's star-laden Little White Lies), and even Animated Family Film (Germany's Animals United).

And the Nominees Are...

Go and vote...

...as long as
See full article at FilmExperience »

Foreign Oscar Track: Israel and Norway

Two more countries, neither of which have ever won the Foreign Film Prize in Hollywood, have announced their finalists lists.

We'll take Norway first since it's less popular with Oscar (5 nominations) and because I stand humbly before you to say I was wrong. My conjecture about what might be submitted -- other than the new Joachim Trier -- was quite wobbly. The three finalists are not the biggies from the Amanda awards but Joachim Trier’s Oslo, August 31st (Oslo, 31. august) which we briefly discussed, Anne Sewitsky’s Happy, Happy (Sykt lykkelig) and Jens Lien’s Sons of Norway (Sønner av Norge). While Trier has the highest international profile, that doesn't always equate with submission choice. Happy Happy is a very frisky marital comedy (I ♥ the trailer) and Sons of Norway is a punk rock coming of age film that even features a cameo from Sex Pistol Johnny Rotten. Neither
See full article at FilmExperience »

NYC’s New Directors/New Films Festival Starts This Wednesday; Lineup Includes “Pariah,” “Black Power Mixtape” & More

Have you picked up your tickets yet?

It’s that time of the year, when the early film festivals debut/premiere some of the films that we’ll be talking about later on in the year.

Sundance, Berlin, Pan African, Fespaco, and South By Southwest Film Festivals are done! And this week, the 40th installment of the New Directors/New Films Film Festival here in New York City, begins!

Press screenings for the festival end today, and I saw around 10 films. I’ve already reviewed 4 or so of them, with another 5 or 6 reviews coming, today and tomorrow. I’ll also include a brief write-up of what to expect at the festival, films you should see, those that you could skip, etc… so stay tuned for that.

The lineup of the New Directors/New Films Film Festival follows below, and those of you who live in New York, or who are
See full article at ShadowAndAct »

New Directors/New Films Selects Matt McCormick’s Debut Feature

Celebrating its 40th year of spotlighting the world’s best up-and-coming feature filmmakers, the Museum of Modern Art and Film Society of Lincoln Center’s prestigious New Directors/New Films series has chosen Portland-based experimental filmmaker Matt McCormick‘s Some Days Are Better Than Others to screen.

McCormick is hardly a “new” director. He’s been making short films and music videos since 1999. However, Some Days Are Better Than Others is his first feature-length project. The movie follows the lives of several quirky Portland residents who all experience the good times of their lives slipping quickly into memory, while their more painful moments are so difficult to let go of.

Starring in the film is Carrie Brownstein, the former guitarist and singer for the band Sleater-Kinney and current star of the hit IFC cable TV series Portlandia. Brownstein previously appeared in Miranda July’s short film Getting Stronger Every Day
See full article at Underground Film Journal »

Film Lineup for the 40th Annual New Directors/New Films Announced

The Museum of Modern Art and the Film Society of Lincoln Center Announce Feature Film Lineup for the 40th Annual New Directors/New Films March 23 . April 3

J.C. Chandor.s .Margin Call. is the Opening Night presentation with Maryam Keshavarz.s Award-winning .Circumstance. the Closing Night selection

The Museum of Modern Art and the Film Society of Lincoln Center announced the full lineup today for the 40th edition of New Directors/New Films (March 23 . April 3). Dedicated to the discovery of new works by emerging and dynamic filmmaking talent, the film festival will screen 28 feature films (24 narrative, 4 documentary) representing 22 countries.

The opening night feature is J.C. Chandor.s Margin Call. Screening on Wednesday, March 23, at 7:00Pm at MoMA, Chandor’s feature film directing debut is a timely and terrifying dramatic expose that tackles twenty-four hours on an investment bank trading floor; a day that brings layer upon layer of human and
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

NYC’s New Directors/New Films Festival Unveils Lineup (“Pariah,” “Black Power Mixtape”) Make The Cut

Ahhh yes, it’s that time of the year, when the early film festivals debut/premiere some of the films that we’ll be talking about later on in the year.

Sundance is done; the Berlin and Pan African Film Festivals are currently underway; the South By Southwest Film Festival takes over Austin, TX in less than a month! And a few days after it ends, the 40th installment of the New Directors/New Films Film Festival here in New York City, begins!

Can’t you just feel the excitement in the air? I can!

And I feel even better knowing that I was granted press credentials by the festival organizers, meaning I’ll be seeing as many of these films for Free, with reviews to follow on this site, afterward, as usual.

The lineup of the New Directors/New Films Film Festival was just unveiled, and those of you who live in New York,
See full article at ShadowAndAct »

Docu from Netherlands wins top prize at Sundance

Docu from Netherlands wins top prize at Sundance
Position Among the Stars directed by Leonard Retel Helmrich from Netherlands won the World Cinema Special Jury Prize for Documentary Films while Being Elmo: A Puppeteer’s Journey, directed by Constance Marks was declared the Winner of the Special Jury Prize, U.S. Documentary Competition. Sundance Film Festival 2011 announced its awards on Monday.

India’s co-production venture with UK and USA, The Bengali Detective, directed by Philip Cox, was presented in the World Cinema Documentary Competition.

List of Awards:

Winner of the World Cinema Special Jury Prize for Documentary Film:

Position Among the Stars (Stand van de Sterren), directed by Leonard Retel Helmrich (Netherlands)

Winner of the World Cinema Cinematography Award for Documentary Filmmaking:

Hell and Back Again, cinematography by Danfung Dennis (U.S.A./U.K.)

Winner of the World Cinema Documentary Editing Award:

The Black Power Mixtape 1967-1975, edited by Goran Hugo Olsson and Hanna Lejonqvist, and directed by Goran Hugo Olsson.
See full article at DearCinema.com »

2011 Sundance Film Festival Award Winners!

2011 Sundance Film Festival Award Winners!
The Jury, Audience, Next! and other special award-winners of the 2011 Sundance Film Festival were announced tonight at the Festival's Awards Ceremony hosted by Tim Blake Nelson (star of Flypaper which premiered in this year's Premieres section) in Park City, Utah. Highlights from the Awards Ceremony can be seen on the Festival website.

Films receiving Jury Awards were selected from four categories: U.S. Dramatic Competition, U.S. Documentary Competition, World Cinema Dramatic Competition and World Cinema Documentary Competition. All films in competition were also eligible for Sundance Film Festival Audience Awards as selected by Festival audiences. The U.S. Audience Awards presented by Acura were announced by Ray Liotta, and the World Cinema Audience Awards were announced by Joshua Leonard. Vera Farmiga announced the Best of Next! Audience Award.

Jury Prizes in Shorts Filmmaking were awarded to American and international short-form films on Tuesday, January 25. Other awards recognized at the
See full article at MovieWeb »

2011 Sundance Film Festival Award Winners

The Sundance Film Festival Juries have selected the winners of the 2011 awards. Since they give out so many awards, the list is extremely long. We shound be playing catch up on the festival now that it is over and things are a little less chaotic. In the meantime here are the winners.

The 2011 Sundance Film Festival Juries consisted of:

U.S. Documentary Competition: Jeffrey Blitz, Matt Groening, Laura Poitras, Jess Search, Sloane Klevin U.S. Dramatic Competition: America Ferrera, Todd McCarthy, Tim Orr, Kimberly Peirce, Jason Reitman World Cinema Documentary Competition: José Padilha, Mette Hoffmann Meyer, Lucy Walker World Cinema Dramatic Competition: Susanne Bier, Bong Joon-Ho, Rajendra Roy Shorts Competition: Barry Jenkins, Kim Morgan, Sara Bernstein Alfred P. Sloan Award: Jon Amiel, Paula Apsell, Sean Carroll, Clark Gregg -

2011 Sundance Film Festival Award Winners:

The Grand Jury Prize: Documentary was presented to How to Die in Oregon, directed by Peter D.
See full article at SoundOnSight »

2011 Sundance Film Festival Award Winners

The Sundance Institute announced the award winners for the 2011 Sundance Film Festival. Like Crazy ended up winning the Dramatic Grand Jury Prize, and Circumstance won the dramatic audience award. I thought Like Crazy was a good film, but it definitely was not one of my favorites or one of the best movie there. I didn't end up getting to see Circumstance.

Check out the full list of winners below:

2011 Sundance Film Festival Award Winners:

The Grand Jury Prize: Documentary was presented to How to Die in Oregon, directed by Peter D. Richardson. In 1994 Oregon became the first state to legalize physician-assisted suicide. How to Die in Oregon gently enters the lives of terminally ill Oregonians to illuminate the power of death with dignity.

The Grand Jury Prize: Dramatic was presented to Like Crazy, directed by Drake Doremus; written by Drake Doremus and Ben York Jones. A young American guy and
See full article at GeekTyrant »

Sundance Confidential X

Festivalgoers came out of screenings of Alrick Brown’s “Kinyarwanda” feeling it had changed their lives. The film, the first to come out of Rwanda since the war, won the World Cinema Audience award

By Christy Karras

(from the 2011 Sundance Film Festival)

It’s time to wrap up the Sundance blog. I’ll miss you … until next year. In the meantime, here are the award winners (presented Saturday night by Tim Blake Nelson, who appeared wearing a snowflake costume, apparently in honor of the sheer cold of much of this year’s festival), along with some thoughts from me on notable films. In short, here’s the Good, the Bad and the Ugly of Sundance 2011:

The Good

The world cinema categories have long been among my favorite at the festival, for several reasons. The quality is uniformly higher than that of the U.S. entries. The films tend to
See full article at Moving Pictures Network »

Sundance Confidential X

Festivalgoers came out of screenings of Alrick Brown’s “Kinyarwanda” feeling it had changed their lives. The film, the first to come out of Rwanda since the war, won the World Cinema Audience award

By Christy Karras

(from the 2011 Sundance Film Festival)

It’s time to wrap up the Sundance blog. I’ll miss you … until next year. In the meantime, here are the award winners (presented Saturday night by Tim Blake Nelson, who appeared wearing a snowflake costume, apparently in honor of the sheer cold of much of this year’s festival), along with some thoughts from me on notable films. In short, here’s the Good, the Bad and the Ugly of Sundance 2011:

The Good

The world cinema categories have long been among my favorite at the festival, for several reasons. The quality is uniformly higher than that of the U.S. entries. The films tend to
See full article at Moving Pictures Magazine »

2011 Sundance Film Festival Award Winners

2011 Sundance Film Festival Award Winners
Tonight the Sundance Institute announced the award winners for the 2011 Sundance Film Festival. Like Crazy won the Dramatic Grand Jury Prize, and Circumstance won the dramatic audience award. You can find the full list of winners in the press release after the jump. 2011 Sundance Film Festival Announces Awards Happy, Happy, Hell and Back Again, How to Die in Oregon and Like Crazy Earn Grand Jury Prizes Audience Favorites Include Buck, Circumstance, Kinyawaranda and Senna to.get.her Awarded Best of Next! Audience Award Park City, Ut–The Jury, Audience, Next! and other special award-winners of the 2011 Sundance Film Festival were announced tonight at the Festival’s Awards Ceremony hosted by Tim Blake Nelson (star of Flypaper which premiered in this year’s Premieres section) in Park City, Utah. Highlights from the Awards Ceremony can be seen on the Festival website, www.sundance.org/festival. Films receiving Jury Awards were selected from four categories: U.
See full article at Slash Film »

2011 Sundance Film Festival Award Winners

2011 Sundance Film Festival Award Winners

The Grand Jury Prize:Documentary was presented to How to Die in Oregon, directed by Peter D. Richardson. In 1994 Oregon became the first state to legalize physician-assisted suicide. How to Die in Oregon gently enters the lives of terminally ill Oregonians to illuminate the power of death with dignity.

The Grand Jury Prize: Dramatic was presented to Like Crazy, directed by Drake Doremus; written by Drake Doremus and Ben York Jones. A young American guy and a young British girl meet in college and fall in love. Their love is tested when she is required to leave the country and they must face the challenges of a long-distance relationship.

The World Cinema Jury Prize: Documentary was presented to Hell and Back Again, directed by Danfung Dennis. Told through the eyes of one Marine from the start of his 2009 Afghanistan tour to his distressing return and rehabilitation in the U.
See full article at Manny the Movie Guy »

2011 Sundance Line-Up Announced

It has been another great year of film. I still have but seven movies left to watch before I complete my “Best of the Year List” but we are already looking towards 2011.

The 57 feature films selected for the four competition programs of the 2011 Sundance Film Festival were announced today, and the titles include some exciting works from returning filmmakers. While the lineup isn’t has loaded with big names it does feature the return of James Marsh whose documentary Man on Wire won the Grand Jury Prize at the fest in 2008. Some interesting movies we should mention that appear on the list are Mike Cahill’s Another Earth, Carlos Moreno’s All Our Dead One (Todos Tus Muertos), Anne Sewitsky’s sexual drama Happy, Happy (Sykt Lykkelig) Rashaad Ernesto Green‘s Gun Hill Road, Sean Durkin‘s Martha Marcy May Marlene, Andrew Okpeaha MacLean‘s On the Ice, Dee Rees
See full article at SoundOnSight »
An error has occured. Please try again.

See also

Showtimes | External Sites


Recently Viewed