Meek's Cutoff (2010) - News Poster

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Panning for Gold: Discovering the New Golden Era of the Western

Panning for Gold: Discovering the New Golden Era of the Western
Perhaps the only genre of film that has ever feared the status of going extinct is the western. For many, it may seem that’s already the case. Believe it or not, this quintessential American genre of filmmaking is still holding on by its bootstraps.

However, despite the abundant history of western movies, the bulk of the filmography pre-dates the 1960s. I argue that the modern era is the true golden age of the western and the showcase for what potential the genre holds.

For me, the western is the epitome of quantity over quality. Prior to the 1960s, the Hollywood machine churned out countless examples of mostly formulaic flicks. Only a select portion of these deserved any significant praise.

Our contemporary fare, however, shows the opposite to be very true. As uncommon as it is to see a new western film hit theaters, or even direct-to-streaming, we find a
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Kelly Reichardt: The Essential Films [Be Reel Podcast]

Kelly Reichardt: The Essential Films [Be Reel Podcast]
Before the entire world shut down, there was an extremely good Kelly Reichardt movie (“First Cow“) halfway into theaters. Now it’s shelved indefinitely, with promises from distributor A24 that it will see theaters again, but our career-spanning look at the American independent stalwart continues.

Read More: Kelly Reichardt On The 16-Year Journey Of ‘First Cow’ & Those Delicious Oily Cakes [Interview]

Known for their lived-in detail, complex female leads and incisive social commentary about class, struggle and identity, Reichardt titles like “Wendy and Lucy” (2008), “Meek’s Cutoff” (2010) and “Night Moves” (2013) examine the age-old cracks in the Pacific Northwest’s rebellious mythology.

Read More: ‘First Cow’: Kelly Reichardt Makes A Tranquil North Western Story About The Nature Of Friendship [Telluride Review]

Often her characters are faced with the difficult choices after bouts of naïveté, trust in “the system” or, frankly, men.

Continue reading Kelly Reichardt: The Essential Films [Be Reel Podcast] at The Playlist.
See full article at The Playlist »

The Best Movies of 2020 So Far

The Best Movies of 2020 So Far
The 2020 release calendar hit a snag with the coronavirus outbreak, but not before a number of cinematic highlights made their way to U.S. screens. IndieWire spent much of 2019 reviewing films on the festival circuit prior to their release dates, and some of them finally made it to theaters this year. Others simply materialized over the last few months, and we’re all the better for having them.

Our running list of the best movies of 2020 so far only includes movies that have received a U.S. theatrical release or have become available on VOD platforms accessible in North America. Films that received a B+ or higher qualify for the list. We’ll keep it updated as the year continues. Check out brief excerpts below and links to the full review.

More from IndieWire'Adventure Time' Is Slowly Going Off the Air, And Everyone's Moving On'Children of Men' Turns 10: Finding
See full article at Indiewire »

How ‘First Cow’ Costume Designer, Dp Helped Craft a Well-Worn Look

  • Variety
How ‘First Cow’ Costume Designer, Dp Helped Craft a Well-Worn Look
Kelly Reichardt’s signature minimalism permeates “First Cow,” a good-natured friendship tale — enmeshed with a subtle critique of capitalism — set in the mid-19th-century Oregon Territory. Based on Jonathan Raymond’s novel “The Half-Life,” the adaptation follows John Magaro’s recluse chef Cookie and Orion Lee’s immigrant runaway King Lu, two dreamers who launch a mischievously lucrative business, frying up biscuits made with milk stolen from the region’s first cow, owned by a wealthy Englishman.

Reichardt entrusted prior collaborators Dp Christopher Blauvelt and costume designer April Napier, to help deliver the film’s look. They drew inspiration from Reichardt’s references, such as “Ugetsu,” Kenji Mizoguchi’s mystery-drama about wartime profiteers, and “The Apu Trilogy,” Satyajit Ray’s coming-of-age classics.

The film shot in cold and wet terrain, but Blauvelt was well-equipped for the elements, having shot Reichardt’s other Pacific Northwest-based pictures, “Certain Women,” “Night Moves” and “Meek’s Cutoff.
See full article at Variety »

‘First Cow’ Marks Career-High Opening For Kelly Reichardt, ‘Emma’ Charms With Massive Expansion – Specialty Box Office

  • Deadline
‘First Cow’ Marks Career-High Opening For Kelly Reichardt, ‘Emma’ Charms With Massive Expansion – Specialty Box Office
There was a stampede of new titles opening this weekend at the specialty box office, and despite coronavirus-induced fears of being in close proximity in theaters, there weren’t any glaring slumps in the indie and arthouse space. Of the films released this weekend, First Cow made some moo-ves at the box office, earning an estimated $96,059 with a per-theater average of $24,015. Not only is that an impressive debut for the A24 title, but it marks a career-high for the talented auteur Kelly Reichardt.

The period film about a prized bovine, starring John Magaro and Orion Lee, had four exclusive runs in New York at the AMC Lincoln Square and Angelika, as well as Los Angeles at the Arclight Hollywood and Landmark. The opening was a solid start for the film that will hopefully fuel the long roll-out that will continue into spring. Reichardt has been lauded for her intimate, cinematic
See full article at Deadline »

Kelly Reichardt Calls Out Quentin Tarantino’s ‘Once Upon a Time in Hollywood’ for Being Too ‘Macho’

Kelly Reichardt Calls Out Quentin Tarantino’s ‘Once Upon a Time in Hollywood’ for Being Too ‘Macho’
Not everyone is a fan of Quentin Tarantino’s Academy Award-winning ode to 1969 Los Angeles, “Once Upon a Time in Hollywood,” especially not filmmaker Kelly Reichardt. The indie director, whose pastoral buddy movie “First Cow” just opened in theaters from A24, told Mel Magazine in a recent interview her thoughts on the movie, one with a sensibility quite the opposite of her new movie.

“I just don’t understand [macho men] — I don’t get it,” Reichardt said. “It’s beyond my comprehension. Like, in ‘Once Upon a Time in Hollywood,’ the idea of the shirtless man on top of the roof — the white man who beats up Bruce Lee, saves the damsel in distress, and sets on fire the ‘scummy hippies’ — I’m just like, ‘Really?’ People love it, but I don’t understand, especially in the climate we live in, how the macho-man thing just keeps being interesting to anybody.
See full article at Indiewire »

Apple Finally Releases ‘The Banker’; ‘First Cow’, ‘Run This Town’, ‘Extra Ordinary’ Open Theatrically – Specialty B.O. Preview

  • Deadline
Apple Finally Releases ‘The Banker’; ‘First Cow’, ‘Run This Town’, ‘Extra Ordinary’ Open Theatrically – Specialty B.O. Preview
A24 is ready to milk the weekend with their new film First Cow from director Kelly Reichardt. The film isn’t about a presidential cow, but it is about a special bovine creature.

Set in the 19th century, the film follows a lone cook (John Magaro) as he travels west with a group of fur trappers. Out of all of them, he connects with a Chinese immigrant (Orion Lee) and they collaborate on a lucrative business that hinges on the participation of a nearby wealthy landowner’s prized milking cow. Through her distinct vision, she tells what seems like a peculiar story but is, in fact, a tale about America and the sensitive depiction of the friendship between two men. All the while, First Cow builds suspense in its own special way.

Co-written by Reichardt and Jonathan Raymond, the film debuted at Telluride in 2019 before making stops at the New
See full article at Deadline »

Kelly Reichardt Crafts Another Character Study With “First Cow”

Kelly Reichardt Crafts Another Character Study With “First Cow”
Over the years, filmmaker Kelly Reichardt has proven to be a rather steady and unique voice in the world of independent cinema. Largely starting with Old Joy (her breakthrough early feature), Reichardt has crafted a host of quality indies, including Wendy and Lucy, Meek’s Cutoff, Night Moves, and Certain Women. Now, she’s back this week with First Cow, which has a feel of mixing some of her greatest hits together, thematically. In that way, she manages to craft perhaps her most accessible work to date. To that end, A24 may well be able to make this one a bit of a small scale crossover success. The film is largely a two hander, looking at an unlikely friendship. After a modern day prologue, we meet Cookie Figowitz (John Magaro). Working as a cook as he heads west, he’s very much a loner, never connecting with anyone. Having joined a
See full article at Hollywoodnews.com »

First Cow | Review

First Cow | Review
Viva La Vache: Reichardt Paints A Surprising Portrait Of Friendship

Kelly Reichardt conjures up an unlikely buddy-movie out of 19th-century fledging America: a tender, no-frills ode to friendship, spiked with pockets of suspense and unexpected laughter. Her vivid, mud-caked frontier (previously explored in her impressionist western Meek’s Cutoff) convinces but never distracts. Instead, from its opening frame, First Cow is rooted in human emotion—and here, it thrives. Reichardt achieves the thrills and laughs of a traditional buddy-movie, with none of the affectation. In fact, her masterfully understated touch is what makes her seventh feature film a winner.

Co-written by repeat collaborator Jonathan Raymond (and very loosely inspired by his 2004 novel “The Half-Life”), the film opens with a thesis from William Blake’s Proverbs of Hell: “The bird a nest, the spider a web, man friendship.”…
See full article at IONCINEMA.com »

‘First Cow’ Film Review: Kelly Reichardt Crafts Another Quiet Masterwork About the Pacific Northwest

  • The Wrap
‘First Cow’ Film Review: Kelly Reichardt Crafts Another Quiet Masterwork About the Pacific Northwest
Kelly Reichardt’s newest film, “First Cow,” calls to mind the work of 19th century landscape artists like Albert Bierstadt or Frederic Edwin Church, whose tactile depiction of each leaf and shard of sunlight is so engrossing that it’s a jolt when you finally notice a couple of tiny figures somewhere in the background, dwarfed by the sheer spectacle of nature.

Most of us have to visit major museums for this experience. But Reichardt paints her own breathtaking landscape and then zooms in on the miniscule humans just trying to survive amidst the greater workings of the world.

She is among the select few modern filmmakers who’ve earned the term “auteur,” and fans will find her personal signatures throughout the film. It’s the fifth of her seven features set in the Pacific Northwest, opens with a scene that brings to mind “Wendy and Lucy,” evokes “Old Joy
See full article at The Wrap »

Best Movies to See In March: ‘Mulan,’ ‘Onward,’ ‘The Hunt’

Best Movies to See In March: ‘Mulan,’ ‘Onward,’ ‘The Hunt’
Summer used to be the time for blockbusters, but the slow creep of all-summer-movies-all-year-long means that we know get a new Pixar film, a live action adaptation of a Disney classic and a sequel to a 2018 horror hit in…March. Also this month: a buddy film involving two frontiersmen and a cow; a sports movie doubling as a fallen star’s potential comeback vehicle; and a film deemed too hot for 2019. Here’s what’s coming soon to a theater near you.

The Burnt Orange Heresy (Mar. 6th)

The tough,
See full article at Rolling Stone »

Berlinale 2020: Kelly Reichardt's Film 'First Cow' is the Bakers' Delight

Berlinale 2020: Kelly Reichardt's Film 'First Cow' is the Bakers' Delight
I would really, really like an oily biscuit with honey and a touch of cinnamon after finishing this film. Please. First Cow is the latest feature made by American filmmaker Kelly Reichardt. After initially premiering at the Telluride & New York Film Festivals last fall, it has made an appearance at the Berlin Film Festival this year showing as a European premiere in the main competition section. Set at the beginning of the 19th century in the rural Northwest (mainly in Oregon), the film is about a friendship and successful local business started by two lonely misfits. It's not just a film about a cow, it's not just a film about friends, and it's not just a film about the Northwest frontier. It has so much depth and heart and humility, an entirely wonderful film. I think I loved it, to be fully honest, which even surprises me. As the title indicates,
See full article at FirstShowing.net »

First Cow review – Kelly Reichardt’s superbly chewy tale of milk cakes in the old west

First Cow review – Kelly Reichardt’s superbly chewy tale of milk cakes in the old west
The Meek’s Cutoff director returns with a distinctive story about a pair of drifters trying to make money by stealing milk from a newly-arrived cow

Kelly Reichardt gives us a terrifically tough and sinewy tale of the old west, shaped by the brutally implacable market forces of capitalism. She and her regular screenwriting collaborator Jonathan Raymond have adapted Raymond’s own 2004 novel The Half-Life, evidently pruning some of the epic adventures in the original and bringing it down to a tensely immediate situation. She and Raymond tell their story with force and skill and the movie is shot with beautiful simplicity. There’s a muscular authority in its plainness and its calm, unshowy evocation of the American landscape.

A prelude in the present day shows a young woman discovering two human skeletons shallowly buried in Oregon woodland. What is the story here? Reichardt takes us back to the 1820s where
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

First Cow Trailer: Reichardt Returns to the Old West

Kelly Reichardt is one of America's greatest contemporary filmmakers; her understated yet powerful films have examined the lives of the working class, the poor, the misfits, and the drifters in Us society of both the past and the present. My favourite film of hers is Meek's Cutoff, an intimate and atypical western that looks at the true dangers of and for settlers and first nations in the late 19th century. Her latest, First Cow, sees Reichardt returning to that old west, this time with a single drifter trying to find a home and survive with a decent living. Mixing this drifter with trappers, settlers, non-white immigrants, first nations persons, and the land-owning elite, the story...

[Read the whole post on screenanarchy.com...]
See full article at Screen Anarchy »

Bizarre First Trailer For The Alchemist Cookbook

Oscilloscope Laboratories is responsible for bringing some offbeat, strange movies to larger audiences. They're the ones who have given movies like Exit Through The Gift Shop, Bellflower, Samsara, and Meek's Cutoff either theatrical or home video releases, and their latest film looks way more "out there" than those films. Here's the trailer for Joel Potrykus' The Alchemist Cookbook, a trippy-looking movie about a guy living alone out in the woods who starts messing with chemicals and eventually encounters Satan (yep). I don't know if this is something I'll be checking out personally, but I'm sure some of you will dig the stylized weirdness you'll find here.

There's no official release date set, but you can pre-order the movie for $14.99 on Oscilloscope's website right here. What do you think?

Young outcast Sean has isolated himself in a trailer in the woods, setting out on alchemic pursuits, with his cat Kaspar as his sole companion.
See full article at GeekTyrant »

Trailer Debut: Meet 'Certain Women' Kristen Stewart and Michelle Williams

  • Fandango
li If you enjoyed the melancholy drama Wendy and Lucy, starring Michelle Williams as a down-on-her-luck drifter who gets separated from her dog in Oregon, and Meek's Cutoff, a tense Western also starring Williams, then you'll be excited for director Kelly Reichardt's latest: Certain Women. In it, three women in different stages and situations of life in a small Montana town are trying to make their own ways in the world, figuring out how to adapt and learn from moments both...

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See full article at Fandango »

Watch: 2 Kelly Reichardt Video Essays, Plus Listen To Her 55-Minute Film Linc Podcast Talk

Singular independent filmmaker Kelly Reichardt has amassed an incredible body of minimalist, austere, and realist cinema that's very much outside the mainstream, never been worried with traditional narrative tropes, and is uncompromising in its dedication to her vision. Her films, often crafted from a raw, Diy aesthetic — “Old Joy," “Wendy and Lucy,” “Meek's Cutoff,” “Night Moves,” and, most recently, the Sundance hit “Certain Women” — have attracted some of the best characters actors in Hollywood (Michelle Williams, Jesse Eisenberg, Peter Sarsgaard, Laura Dern, Kristen Stewart) and often premiere at some of the most prestigious film festivals around the world. Read More: Murder Is Thicker Than Marriage In Trailer For Kelly Reichardt's Newly Restored 'River Of Grass' While her debut 1994 film, “River of Grass,” was nominated for three Independent Spirit Awards, as well as the Grand Jury Prize at the Sundance Film Festival, the movie vanished into obscurity for several.
See full article at The Playlist »

Sundance completes line-up by Amber Wilkinson - 2015-12-08 01:06:34

Rams (Hrútar), directed by Grímur Hákonarson, won the Prize of Un Certain Regard at Cannes 2015 Photo: © Netop Films 2015 Sundance has announced the remaineder of its feature film lineup for the 2016 Sundance Film Festival with the Premieres, Documentary Premieres, Spotlight, Sundance Kids and Special Events sections.

Films from the UK and Ireland were among those announced, including the latest from Amy director Asif Kapadia Ali & Nino - his first fictional outing since Far North in 2007. John Carney's Sing Street - starring Jack Reynor and Aidan Gillan - also joins the Premiere's line-up. The Spotlight section includes several films that premiered in Cannes, including Un Certain Regard winner Rams, Cemetery Of Splendor, Green Room and The Lobster. Established names also in the programme include Werner Herzog, Taika Waititi (Boy, What We Do In The Shadows) and Kelly Kelly Reichardt (Meek's Cutoff, Wendy And Lucy).

Festival director John Cooper said: “The Sundance
See full article at eyeforfilm.co.uk »

The 57 Greatest Westerns Ever, Ranked

It's fitting that Clint Eastwood and John Wayne both have the same birthday week. (Wayne, who died in 1979, was born May 26, 1907, while Eastwood turns 85 on May 31). After all, these two all-American actors' careers span the history of that most American of movie genres, the western.

Both iconic actors were top box office draws for decades, both seldom stretched from their familiar personas, and both played macho, conservative cowboy heroes who let their firearms do most of the talking. Each represented one of two very different strains of western, the traditional and the revisionist.

As a birthday present to Hollywood's biggest heroes of the Wild West, here are the top 57 westerns you need to see.

57. 'Meek's Cutoff' (2010)

Indie filmmaker Kelly Reichardt and her frequent leading lady, Michelle Williams, are the talents behind this sparse, docudrama about an 1845 wagon train whose Oregon Trail journey goes horribly awry. It's an intense
See full article at Moviefone »

Stewart Joins Another Prestige Low-Budget Effort

Kristen Stewart joins Untitled Kelly Reichardt Project (photo: Kristen Stewart in 'Clouds of Sils Maria') This news bit has been everywhere online, but just in case you've missed it: History-making César Award winner Kristen Stewart has joined three-time Oscar-nominee Michelle Williams and two-time Oscar nominee Laura Dern in an as yet untitled drama set in Montana and to be directed by Kelly Reichardt.* Deadline.com first broke the story last week (Feb. 27, 2015). If all goes as planned, Kristen Stewart will play Boise lawyer Beth, who, nervous after accepting a teaching position in a small Montana town, befriends a local woman, Jamie, auditing her class.† Kelly Reichardt's usual partners Neil Kopp and Anish Savjani are producing the project, which is supposed to consist of a series of vignettes based on short stories by Maile Meloy. Also in the cast: James Le Gros (Point Break), Jared Harris (Sherlock Holmes: A Game of Shadows
See full article at Alt Film Guide »
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