6.7/10
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8 user 2 critic

The Art of Action: Martial Arts in Motion Picture (2002)

A look at the history of martial arts films from their chinese roots to the present, presented by Samuel L. Jackson.

Director:

Keith R. Clarke (as Keith Clarke)

Writer:

Keith R. Clarke
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Cast

Credited cast:
David Carradine ... Himself - Interviewee
Jackie Chan ... Himself - Interviewee
Pei-Pei Cheng ... Herself - Interviewee
Raymond Chow ... Himself - Interviewee
Tom Cruise ... Himself
DMX ... Latrell Walker in Exit Wounds (archive footage)
Sammo Kam-Bo Hung ... Himself - Interviewee
Samuel L. Jackson ... Himself - Narrator
Buster Keaton ... Himself (archive footage)
Ang Lee ... Himself - Interviewee
Bruce Lee ... Himself - Interviewee (archive footage)
Raw Leiba ... Himself - Interviewee
Chia-Hui Liu ... Himself - Interviewee
Chia-Liang Liu ... Himself - Interviewee
Hoi Mang ... Himself - Interviewee
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Storyline

A look at the history of martial arts films from their chinese roots to the present, presented by Samuel L. Jackson.

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Genres:

Documentary

Certificate:

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Parents Guide:

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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

June 2002 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

A Arte Marcial no Cinema See more »

Filming Locations:

California, USA See more »

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Color:

Color
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Did You Know?

Quotes

Bruce Lee: To me - okay? - to me, ultimately martial art means honestly expressing yourself. That is very difficult to do.
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Connections

Features The Young Dragons (1974) See more »

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User Reviews

 
Who is this aimed at ?
24 October 2007 | by phillip-58See all my reviews

Obviously made for an American audience who are just discovering martial arts films. Any experienced fan will like the archive footage but wonder why Crouching Tiger features so heavily and so many other seminal films are missing or barely mentioned. I'm also curious why in such a high quality production, some films, such as Jackie Chan's Drunken Master look like they were taped off a TV. The footage of the Shaw's Studio was fascinating as were the interviews, especially by Raymond Chow on Bruce Lee. But Tsui Hark features too much and Steven Seagal is interviewed but none of his films are even mentioned, nor van Damme. So like the proverbial curate's egg, good in bits but could have been so much better.


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