The Manchurian Candidate (2004) - News Poster

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Larry Wilmore

Larry Wilmore
The great Larry Wilmore joins us to share some very personal double features.

Show Notes: Movies Referenced In This Episode

1917 (2019)

Animal Crackers (1930)

Duck Soup (1933)

My Little Chickadee (1940)

A Night At The Opera (1935)

A Hard Day’s Night (1964)

The Manchurian Candidate (1962)

The Manchurian Candidate (2004)

The Parallax View (1974)

Singin’ In The Rain (1952)

A Clockwork Orange (1971)

Planet of the Apes (1968)

Conquest of the Planet of the Apes (1972)

Close Encounters of the Third Kind (1977)

E.T. The Extra-Terrestrial (1982)

Jaws (1975)

The Stepford Wives (1975)

The Party (1968)

The Return of the Pink Panther (1975)

The Pink Panther Strikes Again (1976)

Richard Pryor: Live In Concert (1979)

Richard Pryor: Live And Smokin’ (1971)

Jo Jo Dancer, Your Life Is Calling (1986)

Dolemite Is My Name (2019)

Lenny (1974)

The Human Centipede (First Sequence) (2009)

Lolita (1962)

Caligula (1979)

The Night of the Iguana (1964)

The Elephant Man (1980)

What Would Jack Do? (2020)

Blue Velvet (1986)

The Apartment (1960)

Some Like It Hot (1959)

Double Indemnity (1944)

The Sting (1973)

Butch Cassidy And The Sundance Kid
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

‘McCarthy’: ‘The Painted Bird’ Director Vaclav Marhoul & ‘Ironbark’ Scribe Tom O’Connor Team For Biopic Of ‘Red Scare’ Senator

  • Deadline
‘McCarthy’: ‘The Painted Bird’ Director Vaclav Marhoul & ‘Ironbark’ Scribe Tom O’Connor Team For Biopic Of ‘Red Scare’ Senator
Exclusive: The Painted Bird director Vaclav Marhoul is set to make his English-language debut on McCarthy, a biopic of notorious former U.S. Senator Joseph McCarthy.

Ironbark scribe Tom O’Connor has scripted the intriguing package, which will take a personal look at the influential former politician who rose to fame as a driving force behind anti-communist and anti-homosexual U.S. political sentiment during the Cold War but whose smear tactics and unfounded allegations ultimately led to censure and condemnation.

We hear the script will be a deep dive on the dangerously enigmatic but popular character and how he came to be at the center of one of America’s darkest chapters.

O’Connor, who also wrote The Hitman’s Bodyguard and that movie’s upcoming sequel, will produce with former Lava Bear, Lionsgate and John Wells Productions exec Zach Studin of Veri Media. CAA Media Finance is arranging financing for the
See full article at Deadline »

Michael Mann: Scott Z. Burns’ ‘The Report’ Is ‘Not a Partisan Film, but a Deeply Human One’

  • Variety
Michael Mann: Scott Z. Burns’ ‘The Report’ Is ‘Not a Partisan Film, but a Deeply Human One’
Read more from Variety’s Directors on Directors, in which filmmakers praise their favorite movies of the year, here.

Scott Z. Burns’ “The Report” tells the story of the Herculean efforts of Daniel J. Jones to make sure that the Senate Intelligence Committee report on torture saw the light of day.

Its powerful resonance with “right now” is because it makes us imagine how many thousands of unseen Daniel J. Joneses — mid-range white-collar workers with normal values and decent character — in government are leaving in droves from Justice, State, Fda, Epa, DEA … etc.

Dan Jones is a whistleblower in the tradition of Mark Felt, Karen Silkwood and Jeffrey Wigand; and Scott’s film fully earns its place at the table alongside the iconic pictures of Alan J. Pakula, Sidney Lumet and Mike Nichols, not just because “The Report” is similarly grounded in Washington and government, but because Scott perfectly conveys
See full article at Variety »

Watch ‘Captain America: The Winter Soldier’ Elevator Fight Scene Rehearsal with Chris Evans

Watch ‘Captain America: The Winter Soldier’ Elevator Fight Scene Rehearsal with Chris Evans
Captain America: The Winter Soldier is one of the best sequels in the Marvel Cinematic Universe. Directors Anthony & Joe Russo brought Captain America into political thriller territory that called back to classic movies like The Conversation, Three Days of the condor, All the President’s Men, The Manchurian Candidate and more. Despite pulling from classic […]

The post Watch ‘Captain America: The Winter Soldier’ Elevator Fight Scene Rehearsal with Chris Evans appeared first on /Film.
See full article at Slash Film »

Prophecy: A Monster Movie that Needed a Better Monster

Don Kaye Nov 27, 2019

John Frankenheimer’s 1979 environmental horror movie comes to Blu-ray, flaws and all. Brace yourself.

The 1979 film Prophecy (not to be confused with 1995’s Biblical horror movie The Prophecy) was very much the last gasp of the 1970s boom in ecologically tinged genre movies. It was a string of titles that included No Blade of Grass (1970), Silent Running (1972) and Soylent Green (1973), but leaned especially heavily on the “nature strikes back” subgenre, which gave us such offerings as Frogs (1972), Night of the Lepus (1972), Bug (1975), The Food of the Gods (1976), Day of the Animals (1977) and other, often low-budget quasi-exploitation quickies.

Prophecy on its face seemed to have more going for it. The director was John Frankenheimer, the man behind masterworks like The Manchurian Candidate, Seven Days in May, and Seconds, while the writer was David Seltzer, fresh off his horror classic The Omen. Paramount sunk $12 million into the film, which
See full article at Den of Geek »

Producer Hawk Koch Reveals the Story Behind His Unique Name

Producer Hawk Koch Reveals the Story Behind His Unique Name
What's in a name? Not much, unless you're Hawk Koch. The 73-year-old producer of such films as Wayne's World and Primal Fear — and now the author of Magic Time: My Life in Hollywood, a memoir about his four decades in the business — was born Howard W. Koch Jr., after his father, the much-admired producer of The Manchurian Candidate and Airplane!

As if living in his dad's shadow wasn't hard enough, there was a third Howard Koch in Hollywood: the one who co-wrote Casablanca. So, 23 years ago, at age 50, this Howard Koch adopted his ...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter »

Angela Lansbury’s 10 Best Film and TV Performances, From ‘Gaslight’ to ‘Beauty and the Beast’ (Photos)

  • The Wrap
Angela Lansbury’s 10 Best Film and TV Performances, From ‘Gaslight’ to ‘Beauty and the Beast’ (Photos)
10. “Nanny McPhee” (2005)

Angela Lansbury has often projected an air of menace, as she does playing the near-sighted great-aunt of the newly motherless Brown children in Kirk Jones’ family film. The tightwad meanie gets her comeuppance at a wedding featuring green-frosted cake.

9. “Death on the Nile” (1978)

In this successful adaptation of an Agatha Christie classic, Lansbury plays a romance novelist who might have based one of her characters a little too closely on the murder victim at the center of Hercule Poirot’s investigation

8. “Little Gloria … Happy at Last” (1982)

In this NBC miniseries, based on Gloria Vanderbilt’s best-selling memoir, Lansbury plays the teenage heiress’ aunt who conspires to seize custody of the girl (and her fortune) from her mother. Lansbury earned her first Emmy nomination for the role.

7. “National Velvet” (1944)

In only her second film, Lansbury played the older sister of Elizabeth Taylor’s horse-loving English girl who trains a gelding into a champion.
See full article at The Wrap »

Angela Lansbury movies: 12 greatest films, ranked worst to best, include ‘Beauty and the Beast,’ ‘The Manchurian Candidate’

Angela Lansbury movies: 12 greatest films, ranked worst to best, include ‘Beauty and the Beast,’ ‘The Manchurian Candidate’
Happy 94th birthday to the legendary Angela Lansbury on October 16, 2019!

In her 74 years in show business, Dame Angela has become an icon in film, theater and television. She has been nominated for three Academy Awards and was bestowed with an honorary Oscar in 2013. In addition, she has won two Golden Globe Awards for her film work, as well as two additional nominations. She has also won five Tony Awards (from seven nominations) for her work in the theatre. It has been quite a career. She is one of the few performers equally known for all three entertainment genres, and for that effort she was recognized with a Kennedy Center Honors in 2000.

SEEKennedy Center Honors: 20 Greatest Performances of All Time

Yet the only major award to have eluded Dame Angela is the Emmy. Famously, she has been nominated 18 times for the golden statue and yet has never won the golden statue.
See full article at Gold Derby »

Comic-Con 2019: Scream Factory Announces New Blu-ray Releases, Including Collector’s Editions for My Bloody Valentine (1981), Big Trouble In Little China, and Silver Bullet

Every year, Scream Factory gives horror fans a bunch of new home media releases to look forward to at their annual Comic-Con panel, and this year is certainly no exception, as they've announced an exciting slate of horror Blu-rays on the horizon, including Collector's Editions for Silver Bullet, Big Trouble in Little China, Pet Sematary II, and My Bloody Valentine (1981), as well as The Fly Collection and new Neca figure collaborations for Night of the Demons (1988) and The Slumber Party Massacre.

Complete special features will be revealed at later dates, and we'll be sure to keep Daily Dead readers updated as more details are revealed. In the meantime, we have a look at Scream Factory's full announcement and images of their exclusive Neca figures for Night of the Demons and The Slumber Party Massacre. For more Comic-Con news, visit our online hub to catch up on all of our convention coverage!
See full article at DailyDead »

The Beatles Movies That Never Happened

Once upon a time…or maybe twice…and on a personal note…I’ve been a Beatles fan as long as I can remember. Similarly, I’ve been a movie fanatic for almost as long (though not quite). So, at some point, I naturally started thinking about my favorite Beatle movie moments. Then, I started to ponder the moments that never actually happened. Now, I’m not suggesting that I was lost in some sort of drug-induced Sixties flashback, but rather I was thinking about the several unrealized film projects that the band never actually made.

Sure, A Hard Day’s Night (1964) is fantastic; Help! (1965) has its own unique charm by spoofing the then “new” James Bond style spy film; Yellow Submarine (1968) is sublime in its ground-breaking animated whimsy; and, finally, Magical Mystery Tour (1967) and Let It Be (1970) are pretty darn good celluloid time capsules. But, wouldn’t it have
See full article at CinemaNerdz »

Review: "The Miracle Worker" (1962) Starring Anne Bancroft And Patty Duke; Olive Films Blu-ray Release

  • CinemaRetro
“A Mesmerizing Battle Of Wills”

By Raymond Benson

Some say the year 1939 was the “greatest year of cinema,” and, sure, there were many memorable titles released then that remain classics today. I argue, though, that 1962 was even better. Lawrence of Arabia. To Kill a Mockingbird. Dr. No. The Longest Day. The Manchurian Candidate. The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance. The Music Man. Jules and Jim. And there was also Arthur Penn’s The Miracle Worker.

Based on the stage play by William Gibson (who also wrote the Oscar-nominated screenplay), The Miracle Worker contains two of the most astonishing performances ever put on celluloid. Anne Bancroft and Patty Duke both deservedly won Oscars for their roles, respectively, as the teacher Annie Sullivan and the remarkable Helen Keller as a young girl. The pair light up the screen in intimate, physically-demanding scenes that become a mesmerizing battle of wills—which is what
See full article at CinemaRetro »

The Meg 2 Is Pulling Ideas from Steven Alten's Other Meg Books?

The Meg 2 Is Pulling Ideas from Steven Alten's Other Meg Books?
The Jason Statham kicks a giant prehistoric shark in the face for two hours motion picture The Meg was one of the more entertaining horror-action movies to hit the screen last year. National Treasure and 3 Ninjas director Jon Turteltaub's big-budget adaptation of author Steve Alten's 1997 blockbuster book Meg: A Novel of Deep Terror was a big enough hit with audiences (and kinda critics) that it seems The Meg 2 is set to swim our way sooner rather than later. But more interesting still is the fact that The Meg 2 may be based on one of Alten's other The Meg books.

Producer Lorenzo di Bonaventura recently said in an interview.

"I think a little bit and I'm going to reserve comment because until I read it, I don't want to send people off in the wrong direction."

Fair enough, Di Bonaventura. But just saying The Meg 2 might
See full article at MovieWeb »

Bruno Ganz: He Played Hitler and a Hovering Angel, But Was Most Memorable When Caught Between Good and Evil

  • Variety
Bruno Ganz: He Played Hitler and a Hovering Angel, But Was Most Memorable When Caught Between Good and Evil
A lot of people probably don’t know it, but when the superb Swiss actor Bruno Ganz, who died Friday at 77, took on the role that brought him his greatest jolt of fame, playing Adolf Hitler in “Downfall,” it was one of the most paradoxical casting choices in modern movies. Ganz, portraying Hitler in the final days of World War II, when the Führer was trapped in his bunker, did an impersonation of Hitler at his most full-throttle fulminating. The performance was raging, antic, operatic, possessed; it was true homicidal acting. (That’s one reason why “Downfall” became the movie that launched a thousand Hitler Internet memes.)

Yet up until then, that kind of smash-mouth volatility had almost nothing to do with the persona of Bruno Ganz. He was sly, pensive, puckish yet woeful, inwardly commanding, almost always intensely becalmed, an actor with a light in his eye that could
See full article at Variety »

Bruno Ganz Dies: Swiss Actor In ‘Downfall’ Was 77

  • Deadline
Bruno Ganz Dies: Swiss Actor In ‘Downfall’ Was 77
Bruno Ganz, whose best-known roles were portraying the extremes of an angel and Adolph Hitler, died in Zurich at age 77 on Friday. His cause of death was colon cancer, according to representatives.

His memorable portrayal of German dictator Adolph Hitler in 2004’s Downfall was considered Ganz’s biggest role. But his appearance as an angel in the 1987 Wim Wenders film Wings of Desire also drew accolades. He later reprised that role in the 1993 follow, Faraway, So Close!

Among his other critically hailed roles included appearances in Stephen Daldry’s Oscar-nominated The Reader (2008), Werner Herzog’s Nosferatu, the Jonathan Demme remake of The Manchurian Candidate and Franklin J. Schaffner’s The Boys from Brazil.

But it was the role of Hitler that truly made Ganz. Some criticized him for humanizing the brutal dictator, but Ganz’s portrayal later became popular in the social media age, as clever meme creators gave people
See full article at Deadline »

Bruno Ganz, Swiss Actor Who Portrayed Hitler in ‘Downfall,’ Dead at 77

Bruno Ganz, Swiss Actor Who Portrayed Hitler in ‘Downfall,’ Dead at 77
Bruno Ganz, the renowned Swiss actor who portrayed Adolf Hitler in 2004’s Downfall and an angel in 1987’s Wings of Desire, died Friday at the age of 77.

The actor died at his home in Zurich, his management confirmed to the BBC, who added that Ganz reportedly suffered from colon cancer.

“Bruno Ganz was one of the greatest and most versatile actors ‘who inspired generations of film fans,’ the Berlinale Film Festival tweeted Saturday. “We are incredibly saddened by the loss of a long-standing festival companion and outstanding figure of the international film history.
See full article at Rolling Stone »

Bruno Ganz, Star of ‘Downfall’ and ‘Wings of Desire,’ Dies at 77

  • Variety
Bruno Ganz, Star of ‘Downfall’ and ‘Wings of Desire,’ Dies at 77
Bruno Ganz, the Swiss actor best known for dramatizing Adolf Hitler’s final days in 2004’s “Downfall,” has died. He was 77.

Ganz died at his home in Zurich on Friday, his representatives told media outlets. The cause of death was reportedly colon cancer.

In addition to delivering one of the definitive cinematic portrayals of Hitler, Ganz played an angel who gives up immortality to experience earthly pleasures in Wim Wenders’ classic film “Wings of Desire” (1987). He reprised that role in Wenders’ 1993 follow-up, “Faraway, So Close!”

His celestial performance was so memorable that Ganz once recounted how people ascribed special powers to him when they recognized him in public.

“People in planes said: ‘Ah, no need to be afraid, because with you here, nothing can happen. Now we are safe,'” Ganz told the Danish film journal P.O.V. “Or a mother said to her child: ‘Look, there’s your guardian angel.
See full article at Variety »

Bruno Ganz, Star of ‘Downfall’ and ‘Wings of Desire,’ Dies at 77

  • Variety
Bruno Ganz, Star of ‘Downfall’ and ‘Wings of Desire,’ Dies at 77
Bruno Ganz, the Swiss actor best known for dramatizing Adolf Hitler’s final days in 2004’s “Downfall,” has died. He was 77.

Ganz died at his home in Zurich on Friday, his representatives told media outlets. The cause of death was reportedly colon cancer.

In addition to delivering one of the definitive cinematic portrayals of Hitler, Ganz played an angel who gives up immortality to experience earthly pleasures in Wim Wenders’ classic film “Wings of Desire” (1987). He reprised that role in Wenders’ 1993 follow-up, “Faraway, So Close!”

His celestial performance was so memorable that Ganz once recounted how people ascribed special powers to him when they recognized him in public.

“People in planes said: ‘Ah, no need to be afraid, because with you here, nothing can happen. Now we are safe,'” Ganz told the Danish film journal P.O.V. “Or a mother said to her child: ‘Look, there’s your guardian angel.
See full article at Variety »

Bruno Ganz, Who Played Hitler in ‘Downfall,’ Dies at 77

  • The Wrap
Bruno Ganz, Who Played Hitler in ‘Downfall,’ Dies at 77
Bruno Ganz, the Swiss actor whose work ranged from playing an angel in Wim Wenders’ “Wings of Desire” to an on-the-edge-of-defeat Adolf Hitler in the much-memed “Downfall,” has died at age 77.

He died at his home in Zurich on Friday after a diagnosis of colon cancer, his agent told France 24.

In his long career, Ganz appeared in more than 80 films and TV movies, mostly in Europe. He starred as a hit man opposite Dennis Hopper in Wenders’ 1977 film noir “The American Friend,” and then reteamed with the director a decade later for “Wings of Desire,” playing an angel sent to earth to comfort dying humans, who begins to long for humanity for himself.

Also Read: Hollywood's Notable Deaths of 2019 (Photos)

In Werner Herzog’s 1979 “Nosferatu the Vampyre,” Ganz played the human Jonathan Harker to Klaus Kinski’s otherworldly Dracula. And he starred as a Venice cafe worker who romances
See full article at The Wrap »

ABC Orders Pilot for Drama ‘The Baker and The Beauty’ Based on Israeli Series

  • Variety
ABC has ordered the American adaptation of “The Baker and the Beauty” to pilot.

Based on the Israeli romantic comedy series of the same name, the series tells the story of the unlikely romance between a blue-collar baker and an international superstar. Theirs is a relationship that not only upends their own lives, but the lives of their two very different families.

Dean Georgaris will write and executive produce, with David Frankel set to direct and executive produce. Avi Nir, Alon Shtruzman, Peter Traugott, and Rachel Kaplan of Keshet Studios will also executive produce along with original series creator Assi Azar. Universal Television and ABC Studios will produce in association with Keshet.

Georgaris most recently worked on the screenplay for the hit film “The Meg.” His other feature credits include “Lara Croft Tomb Raider: The Cradle of Life,” “Paycheck,” the 2004 remake of the “The Manchurian Candidate,” and “Tristan + Isolde.
See full article at Variety »

Luca Guadagnino On How ‘Suspiria’ Is A “Relentless Ode To The Great And Tremendous Power Of Womanhood” – Podcast

  • Deadline
Luca Guadagnino On How ‘Suspiria’ Is A “Relentless Ode To The Great And Tremendous Power Of Womanhood” – Podcast
It’s a bold move when another auteur remakes another auteur’s movie.

Martin Scorsese did it with J. Lee Thompson’s 1962 Cape Fear in 1992. Jonathan Demme had a revisionist take on John Frankenheimer’s 1962 political-thriller classic The Manchurian Candidate, casting Denzel Washington in the Frank Sinatra role of Ben Marco in 2004. Gus Van Sant remade Alfred Hitchcock’s 1960 Psycho shot-for-shot in 1998 with Vince Vaughn, Anne Heche, Julianne Moore and Viggo Mortensen.

Remaking Dario Argento’s 1977 giallo Suspiria has been a passion of Oscar-nominated filmmaker Luca Guadagnino since he was a teenager, and in 2007 he went after the rights when Miramax decided against a re-do.

When Gaudagnino sat down with Argento to get advice on a recreating Suspiria, the horror director gave his full blessing: “I have no advice, do your movie’ he told me,” says the Call Me By Your Name director.

Perceived as a fun campy pic back in its day by critics,
See full article at Deadline »
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