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The Arrival and Its Uniquely 1990s Sci-Fi Approach

Ryan Lambie May 31, 2019

Before Arrival there was Charlie Sheen in The Arrival, which was an unusual piece of 1990s sci-fi

When it came to sci-fi movies, 1996 was a crowded year: at the high end of the budget spectrum we had the invasion movies Independence Day and Mars Attacks; towards the middle we had John Carpenter's disappointing Snake Plissken sequel Escape From La, while Rutger Hauer starred in the cheap and cheerful Crossworlds and the brilliantly titled Omega Doom.

Throw in the startlingly botched Island Of Doctor Moreau, Star Trek: First Contact, and Stuart Gordon's fun sci-fi oddity Space Truckers, and you have a busy 12 months in genre movies. Somewhat lost in the static was The Arrival, a nifty genre thriller which had the misfortune of coming out just a few weeks before the bigger, splashier Independence Day. A more modest and quirkier movie than Roland Emmerich's invasion flick,
See full article at Den of Geek »

The Arrival: exploring a gloriously odd 90s sci-fi film

Ryan Lambie Nov 2, 2016

Before Arrival there was Charlie Sheen in The Arrival. Ryan takes a look at an unusual 90s sci-fi film...

When it came to sci-fi movies, 1996 was a crowded year: at the high end of the budget spectrum we had the invasion movies Independence Day and Mars Attacks; towards the middle we had John Carpenter's disappointing Snake Plissken sequel Escape From La, while Rutger Hauer starred in the cheap and cheerful Crossworlds and the brilliantly titled Omega Doom.

Throw in the startlingly botched Island Of Doctor Moreau, Star Trek: First Contact and Stuart Gordon's fun sci-fi oddity Space Truckers, and you have a busy 12 months in genre movies. Somewhat lost in the static was The Arrival, a nifty genre thriller which had the misfortune of coming out just a few weeks before the bigger, splashier Independence Day. A more modest and quirkier movie than Roland Emmerich's invasion flick,
See full article at Den of Geek »

The Dusty VHS Corner: Albert Pyun Loves Cyborgs

In the latest instalment of The Dusty VHS Corner, Tom Jolliffe explores Albert Pyun’s love for cyborgs…

With a career spanning over 30 years, Hawaiian director Albert Pyun has worked in just about every genre, and forged a reputation as a modern era answer to Ed Wood. Pyun’s career has pretty much entirely taken place in B movies. Almost fifty films ranging from low budget, to virtually no budget. His passion for movie-making is immense and he still works to this day, even through ill-health.

Pyun broke through in the early 80’s with fantasy epic, The Sword and The Sorcerer, which alongside Conan The Barbarian, played it’s part in re-popularising the sword and sorcery genre throughout the 80’s. He followed that with a string of often strange, cult films (Radioactive Dreams being a stand out). Pyun was also at the helm of an unsuccessful Captain America film back
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

The top 25 cult film actors

They may not be household names like their A-list colleagues, but the actors on this list have appeared in some of our all-time favourite geek movies...

Some actors dabble in sci-fi; others dip their toe into fantasy; some may even make an appearance in the odd horror film - all before returning to the safety of the genres in which they feel more comfortable - perhaps a nice, award-chasing period drama, or a well-paid romantic comedy.

A-listers may see the geeky films that we on this site enjoy and celebrate as fun little side-projects, but there are actors out there who commit full-time to these types of movies. It is high time, therefore, that we credited these individuals with the recognition they deserve.

Besides the stipulation that, in order to be included, an actor had to still be alive and working today, there were no strict criteria that had to
See full article at Den of Geek »

Horror at the Oscars Part 2: This Time It's Personal

Horror fanatics are still buzzing like chainsaws over the Academy Awards’ genre montage. Anywhere there could be a conversation about it online, there was one. Many were upset over the Twilight ‘tweens’ participation, as if their mere presence sent a message about the state of scary in Hollyweird, USA.

A few seemed happy, though, to just get a glimpse of their beloved Evil Dead and Texas Chainsaw Massacre 2 if only for a few seconds. But many called the selections generic and thoughtless, demanding the likes of Demons and TerrorVision instead (well, maybe not TerrorVision; that was just me).

How about Henry: Portrait of a Serial Killer? Re-Animator? It’s Alive? Tombs of the Blind Dead? Coffin Joe? No list is perfect, but with a bit more care and a phone call to any one of us, the Oscars could have elevated that section into a real scream. Or maybe they
See full article at Dread Central »

Horror at the Oscars Part 1: The Quickening

It’s that time of year again, kids. Dread Central’s 2010 Horror at the Oscars coverage. Horror was indeed present this year and in black-tie. While Roger Corman and Lauren Bacall were honored a few months back at the Governor’s Award Ceremony, it was an unexpected delight to see Corman, recipient of the lifetime achievement Oscar, enjoy a standing ovation on national television.

I was, however, very disappointed that neither of them were allowed to speak. Roger Corman’s contributions to modern cinema are too vast for him to just stand up and wave. James Cameron was one of many Corman acolytes present, and his nomination speaks to Corman’s tremendous legacy. On the Terminator DVD Cameron mentions, "I trained at the Roger Corman Film School.” Jonathan Demme, Martin Scorsese, and Francis Ford Coppola, among many others, were also former students.

The terror continued with a spoof of Paranormal Activity
See full article at Dread Central »

Cyborg and Nemesis writers pen the "ultimate post nuclear cyber punk action film" for Albert Pyun

"It’s the underground cyberpunk world versus the surface tribes of mechanized warriors. In essence it’s software versus hardware." -- Albert Pyun

I know what you're all thinking, and yes, out of two solitary posts today, both were about Albert Pyun, but when news is this cool it just cannot wait. Pyun's new website has just gone live and on it he says he's heading back to his post-apocalyptic / cyberpunk roots to make the "ultimate post nuclear cyber punk action film." Not only that, but he got Cyborg writer Kitty Chalmers, Nemesis writer Rebecca Charles and Tales of Ancient Empire writer Cynthia Curnan to co-write it. F*ck. Yeah.

Here's what he says about the yet untitled project:

"Incredibly ambitious and with action set pieces that are honestly mindblowing. The world these three writers have created is so dense and rich and populated with remarkable characters like “Nen Tenndo
See full article at QuietEarth »

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