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Link Tank: The International Future of the Oscars

Den of Geek Staff Jan 15, 2020

The Academy Award's international future, the deadly effects of burnout, the end of Internet Explorer, and more in today's Link Tank!

The Academy Awards are looking to have a bright future internationally as its film selections expands beyond the United States.

"In the 90-year history of the Academy Awards, 554 movies have been nominated for Best Picture. Among that number have been timeless classics and a whole lot of best-forgotten duds. What's truly incredible, though, is that only 11 foreign-language movies have even been nominated to compete for Best Picture since 1929 — and none have ever won."

Read more at The Week.

It's time that McU fans let Chris Evans and Robert Downey Jr. live beyond the Marvel franchise.

"We’re barely a month into 2020, and everyone still is asking Robert Downey Jr. and Chris Evans when they’re going back to Marvel. It’s not even been
See full article at Den of Geek »

Will ‘Parasite’ Work as an HBO Miniseries? (Column)

  • Variety
Will ‘Parasite’ Work as an HBO Miniseries? (Column)
There’s a time-honored tradition of turning celebrated movies into television series. A lot of them have ended up as sitcoms: “The Odd Couple,” “M*A*S*H,” “Alice” (spun out of Martin Scorsese’s 1974 landmark “Alice Doesn’t Live Here Anymore”). But not all of them. Did you know that “Casablanca” was turned into two different TV series, one in 1955 and one in 1983? (The latter starred David Soul as Rick Blaine!) In 1976, they tried it with “Serpico.” Sometimes, a series can seem a true extension of the movie it’s adapted from — that’s what happened with “Fargo” and “Dear White People.” Sometimes, the movie that spawned a series will come to seem a mere footnote to the show — that’s what happened with “Buffy the Vampire Slayer” and “Friday Night Lights.” And in the case of “Parenthood” (though it took two tries to get it right), a movie can be turned into
See full article at Variety »

Why Hollywood Rarely Depicts World War I in Film

  • Variety
Why Hollywood Rarely Depicts World War I in Film
World War II has been a favorite subject of Hollywood since 1940, before the U.S. even entered the fighting. But the industry has been less interested in World War I, aka The Great War or The War to End All Wars (as it was sadly/optimistically dubbed).

In the past 25 years, there have been 16 best-picture Oscar nominees set during WWII. In those same years, there was only one set in World War I: Steven Spielberg’s “War Horse.” This is just one of many reasons why Universal-DreamWorks’ “1917,” a strong Oscar contender this year, seems so remarkable.

Krysty Wilson-Cairns, who co-wrote “1917” with director Sam Mendes, says she’s not surprised filmmakers have gravitated to the later war. “The Second World War was about countries uniting to fight the tyranny of the Nazis; it seemed like the only option to save humanity. But with the First World War, the motivations are obscure.
See full article at Variety »

Ten Super Cool Gift Ideas For Movie Buffs

Everyone has a favorite movie or two that they can quote verbatim and can always make time to watch over and over again. The love of a good story is something most people have in common and a quiet night at home with a good movie is a fun, relaxing way to spend an evening. If you’re looking for the perfect gift for your favorite movie lover then check out this list of cool toys and useful products that will help enhance the at-home cinematic experience.

#1. Preserved Real Rose In A Glass Dome

Every little girl dreams of being Belle from Beauty and the Beast. Who wouldn’t want that gigantic library or your own talking dishes? One of the most iconic Disney gifts ever given has to be the rose in a glass jar that counts down the days until true love must be found. Now you can
See full article at AsianMoviePulse »

Before they were famous they served on the front lines of World War I

Before they were famous they served on the front lines of World War I
Sam Mendes’ acclaimed World War I epic “1917” graphically shows how the Great War was indeed hell. And numerous actors and filmmakers were there on the front lines or bravely engaging in dogfights in the sky over France. Just as Mendes’ illustrates in “1917,” the combat took its toll on these soldiers who went on to fame in feature films. Numerous were wounded, gassed and even were POWs. Needless to say, the majority were never the same.

Here’s a look at 10 actors, who became stars during the Golden Age of Hollywood, who participated in World War I

Humphrey Bogart

Long before he uttered “Here’s looking at you kid” in 1942’s “Casablanca,” the Oscar-winning superstar was a teenager when he enlisted in the Navy in May of 1918 where he was assigned to the ship the Leviathan. And it was during this time, he suffered the injury that created the scar on
See full article at Gold Derby »

The 25 Best Movie Moments of 2019

  • Indiewire
The 25 Best Movie Moments of 2019
If the best films of 2019 have anything in common, it’s that they each feel somehow emblematic of the decade that they closed. Following on the heels of “Silence” and “The Wolf of Wall Street,” Martin Scorsese delivered another morally ambiguous period epic about the weight of our sins. Less than three years after looking for “The Lost City of Z,” James Gray shot the moon with “Ad Astra,” his greatest movie about the search for a mythic place to make us whole.

After establishing her extraordinary talents with the likes of “Tomboy” and “Girlhood,” “Portrait of a Lady on Fire” auteur Céline Sciamma rocked Cannes with her most shattering tale of love and loss and self-discovery, and capped off a remarkable decade of gay screen romances in the process. Bong Joon Ho, never capitalism’s biggest cheerleader, weaponized his usual proclivities in a way that saw him become a genre unto himself.
See full article at Indiewire »

​Marrakech’s Atlas Workshops awards 2019 prizes to Ethiopian, Rwandan filmmakers

  • ScreenDaily
​Marrakech’s Atlas Workshops awards 2019 prizes to Ethiopian, Rwandan filmmakers
Emerging African filmmakers triumph at project development event.

Ethiopian director Hiwot Admasu Getaneh’s Addis Ababa-set tale of self-discovery Sweet Annoyance scooped the top €10,000 development prize at the Marrakech International Film Festival’s second Atlas Workshops on Friday (Dec 6).

The four-day meeting drew some 270 international cinema professionals and presented 28 projects in development and post-production from Middle Eastern, North African and African filmmakers.

The jury for the 10 projects in the running for the Atlas Development Awards was composed of Moroccan director Laïla Marrakchi, Lebanese producer Georges Schoucair and Juliette Schrameck, managing director of Paris-based mk2 Films.

Set against the nightlife of the Ethiopian capital,
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Lamia Chraibi Teams With Hicham Lasri on Pan-Arab Supernatural Series ‘Meskoun’ (Exclusive)

  • Variety
Lamia Chraibi Teams With Hicham Lasri on Pan-Arab Supernatural Series ‘Meskoun’ (Exclusive)
Lamia Chraibi, a leading producer of daring films from the Middle East and North Africa region, is developing “Meskoun,” an ambitious pan-Arab genre-bending series with Moroccan filmmaker Hicham Lasri (“Jahilya”) on board as showrunner.

Chraibi (“Mimosas”) will produce the 14-episode series with her Moroccan banner La Prod, along with Mohamed Hefzy’s Egyptian company Film Clinic, Lebanese outfit Abbout Productions and Habib Attia’s Tunisian company Cinetelefilms.

“Meskoun” follows Lotfi, a young man who lost his fiancée and decides to take off to Europe without a permit, and tries crossing the sea. But Lotfi ends up drowning in high waters with seven other illegal immigrants from different nationalities. A month later, he reemerges inhabited by the souls of the seven strangers who drowned with him. In order to free himself from these souls, Lotfi, who has become a sort of unwilling superhero, must accomplish their respective last wish, taking him
See full article at Variety »

‘Irishman’ and ‘Joker’ Producer: Oscar Double Play for a Fourth Time?

  • Variety
‘Irishman’ and ‘Joker’ Producer: Oscar Double Play for a Fourth Time?
In 91 years of Academy Awards, there have only been three occasions when a producer had two best picture nominees simultaneously: Francis Coppola and Fred Roos, with 1974’s “The Godfather Part II” and “The Conversation”; Scott Rudin, with 2010’s “The Social Network” and “True Grit”; and Megan Ellison, with 2013’s “American Hustle” and “Her.”

That could happen this year with Emma Tillinger Koskoff, who produced “The Irishman” and “Joker.” As a bonus, she was also exec producer on “Uncut Gems.” In other words, she’s having a good year.

Tillinger Koskoff freely admits that many people, even within the industry, are unclear on a producer’s role: “Some producers find the material and develop it. Some raise the funds and never go to the set. That’s not what I do.” What she does do: Pay attention to the filmmaker’s vision, and do everything necessary to bring it to life.
See full article at Variety »

‘SNL’: ‘Wizard of Oz’ Sketch About Mad Munchkins Is Wicked Funny

  • Deadline
‘SNL’: ‘Wizard of Oz’ Sketch About Mad Munchkins Is Wicked Funny
There’s no place like home but sometimes it has unexpected shortcomings of its own. That was the lesson learned by the still-concussed Dorothy Gale (Kate McKinnon) in the black-and-white “alternate ending” to The Wizard of Oz, the celluloid artifact that was spotlighted tonight on an Saturday Night Live sketch.

It was framed as another installment of the fictional PBS show Cinema Classics, hosted by the feckless Reese De’What (Kenan Thompson), whose previous Old Hollywood targets have included Casablanca and To Have and Have Not.

McKinnon’s Dorothy is back in her bed Kansas with her head spinning and trying to set out her memories of the fantastical realm that she visited on the far side of the rainbow. Just like the familiar version of the MGM classic, Dorothy tells the farmhands that they were there in her dream as Scarecrow, the Tin Woodsman, and the Cowardly Lion. The scene veers,
See full article at Deadline »

Arthur Marks Dies: Producer And Director Of ‘Perry Mason’ & Blaxploitation Films Was 92

  • Deadline
Arthur Marks Dies: Producer And Director Of ‘Perry Mason’ & Blaxploitation Films Was 92
Arthur Marks, a writer, producer and director best known for his work on CBS series Perry Mason and for directing blaxploitation films, has died at age 92, his family confirmed to Deadline.

Marks was born August 2, 1927 in Los Angeles. His grandparents acted in silent pictures and his father Dave Marks was an assistant director and production manager at MGM.

Arthur Marks began his film career as a background actor and in bit parts on such films in the 1930s and ‘40s as Boys Town, The Good Earth and the Andy Hardy series.

Marks left Hollywood to join the United States Merchant Marines during World War II and served in the Navy during the Korean War.

He briefly attended Santa Monica College and the University of Southern California, before landing a job in the production department at MGM Studios. His career took off in the 1950s as an assistant director at Columbia.
See full article at Deadline »

Arthur Marks, ‘Perry Mason’ and Blaxploitation Director, Dies at 92

  • Variety
Arthur Marks, ‘Perry Mason’ and Blaxploitation Director, Dies at 92
Prolific producer and director Arthur Marks, who worked on “Perry Mason” and blaxploitation movies including “Detroit 9000” and “Friday Foster,” has died. He was 92.

Marks died Nov. 13 at his home in Woodland Hills, Calif. His son, “Narcos” producer Paul Marks, confirmed his passing to Variety.

Marks was a native of Los Angeles who was born in 1927 into a show business family. His grandparents were actors in silent pictures and his father, Dave Marks, worked as an MGM assistant director and production manager who worked on “The Wizard of Oz” and “Easter Parade.” Arthur Marks worked as a child actor, getting work as an extra and bit player on “The Good Earth” (1937), “Boys Town” (1938) and Mickey Rooney’s Andy Hardy series.

Marks joined the U.S. Merchant Marine Academy during World War II and served with the U.S. Navy during the Korean War. He began working in the production department at MGM,
See full article at Variety »

Christopher Nolan Hopes Nitrate Print of ‘Rebecca’ Will Reestablish the Film’s Place in Hitchcock’s Legacy

  • Indiewire
Christopher Nolan Hopes Nitrate Print of ‘Rebecca’ Will Reestablish the Film’s Place in Hitchcock’s Legacy
It was the go-to motion-picture medium for the first half of the 20th century, but after nitrate film stock was discontinued by Kodak in 1952, nitrate prints of many classic movies were given a lonesome life locked away in vaults. That’s in part because nitrate film is very similar to guncotton, so flammable that it burns even underwater — haphazard handling can lead to disastrous effects when you’re talking about film moving through a projector at 24 frames per second, inches away from a red-hot 6,000-watt bulb.

“It’s a lot of work,” said Jared Case, curator of film exhibitions at the George Eastman Museum based in Rochester, New York. “It’s a museum artifact that needs a tool in order to be seen. You have to maintain the projectors. You have to make sure that they are clean and that they’re running properly. Our chief projectionist is so careful
See full article at Indiewire »

Claude Rains movies: 15 greatest films, ranked worst to best, include ‘Casablanca,’ ‘The Invisible Man,’ ‘Notorious’

  • Gold Derby
Claude Rains movies: 15 greatest films, ranked worst to best, include ‘Casablanca,’ ‘The Invisible Man,’ ‘Notorious’
If you’re not a fan of classic cinema, you may not recognize his name. However, in addition to becoming a renowned Oscar-nominated character actor with one of the industry’s most distinctive voices, Claude Rains also taught the craft to some of cinema’s most legendary actors.

Born on November 10, 1899 in London, the future actor who would become known for his elegance and quiet authority had very humble beginnings. His father was a stage actor, and the family lived in poverty, with Rains being one of only three children out of twelve to not die from poverty-related issues. He had a heavy cockney accent and a stutter, and dropped out of school after second grade to earn money for the family. Growing up around the theater, he was soon performing in plays, starting at the age of ten. In 1913, he came to America to find work in the New York theaters,
See full article at Gold Derby »

Claude Rains movies: 15 greatest films ranked from worst to best

  • Gold Derby
Claude Rains movies: 15 greatest films ranked from worst to best
If you’re not a fan of classic cinema, you may not recognize his name. However, in addition to becoming a renowned Oscar-nominated character actor with one of the industry’s most distinctive voices, Claude Rains also taught the craft to some of cinema’s most legendary actors.

Born on November 10, 1899 in London, the future actor who would become known for his elegance and quiet authority had very humble beginnings. His father was a stage actor, and the family lived in poverty, with Rains being one of only three children out of twelve to not die from poverty-related issues. He had a heavy cockney accent and a stutter, and dropped out of school after second grade to earn money for the family. Growing up around the theater, he was soon performing in plays, starting at the age of ten. In 1913, he came to America to find work in the New York theaters,
See full article at Gold Derby »

The Man Between

Critics compare this sophisticated spy thriller to Carol Reed’s earlier Triumph set in Vienna with Joseph Cotten and Orson Welles — but it’s a different story altogether, not about black-market evil but the perils of moral compromise in a divided Berlin. James Mason and Claire Bloom are stunningly good together, in a moody suspense that’s completely serious — no comic relief or ‘fun’ jeopardy to distract from the fascinating, you-are-there setting, a Berlin trying to rebuild itself. With Hildegard Knef, and an extended, beautifully filmed nighttime chase that seals an unlikely romance.

The Man Between

Blu-ray

Kl Studio Classics

1953 / B&w / 1:37 flat Academy / 102 min. / Street Date November 5, 2019 / available through Kino Lorber / 29.95

Starring: James Mason, Claire Bloom, Hildegard Knef, Geoffrey Toone, Aribert Wäscher, Ernst Schróder, Dieter Krause, Hilde Sessak, Karl John, Ljuba Welitsch, Reinhard Kolldehoff.

Cinematography: Desmond Dickinson

Film Editor: Bert Bates

Original Music: John Addison

Written by Harry Kurnitz,
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Film Review: A Hairy Tale (2019) by Homayoun Ghanizadeh

Iranian avant-garde theatre director Homayoun Ghanizadeh, after years of staging plays, decided to try his hand also at a different medium, to a maverick and pleasingly dotty result. “The Hairy Tale” (Maskharehbaz) however is not his first rendezvous with the tenth muse, as he starred in Mani Haghighi’s “The Dragon Arrives!” (2016), which screened in Berlinale’s main competition and in 2018 he directed the short movie “Irreversible”.

A Hairy Tale” screened at the 35th Warsaw Film Festival

Ghanizadeh’s debut feature, which premiered internationally at the 35th Warsaw Film Festival where it was awarded for the script, in the catalogue description is labeled as a “black comedy”. The director skillfully juggles with dark humor paraphernalia and joins them with a dream-like convention, use of specific camera angles, CGI and color palette, drawing parallels with Jean-Pierre Jeunet. But behind the facade of entertaining form, he sneaks in the bitter observations and addresses important social issues.
See full article at AsianMoviePulse »

Why Microsoft and Warner Bros. Archived the Original ‘Superman’ Movie on a Futuristic Glass Disc (Exclusive)

  • Variety
Microsoft has teamed up with Warner Bros. to store a copy of the 1978 movie “Superman” on a small glass disc about the size of a coaster. The collaboration, which will be officially unveiled at Microsoft’s Ignite 2019 conference in Orlando, Florida Monday, is a first test case for a new storage technology that could eventually help safeguard Hollywood’s movies and TV shows, as well as many other forms of data, for centuries to come.

“Glass has a very, very long lifetime,” said Microsoft Research principal researcher Ant Rowstron in a recent conversation with Variety. “Thousands of years.”

The piece of silica glass storing the 1978 “Superman” movie, measuring 7.5 cm x 7.5 cm x 2 mm. The glass contains 75.6 Gb of data plus error redundancy codes.

Microsoft began to investigate glass as a storage medium in 2016 in partnership with the University of Southampton Optoelectonics Research Centre. The goal of these efforts, dubbed “Project Silica,
See full article at Variety »

Producer Hawk Koch Reveals the Story Behind His Unique Name

Producer Hawk Koch Reveals the Story Behind His Unique Name
What's in a name? Not much, unless you're Hawk Koch. The 73-year-old producer of such films as Wayne's World and Primal Fear — and now the author of Magic Time: My Life in Hollywood, a memoir about his four decades in the business — was born Howard W. Koch Jr., after his father, the much-admired producer of The Manchurian Candidate and Airplane!

As if living in his dad's shadow wasn't hard enough, there was a third Howard Koch in Hollywood: the one who co-wrote Casablanca. So, 23 years ago, at age 50, this Howard Koch adopted his ...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter »

HBO Max Will Have a Turner Classic Movies Collection

  • MovieWeb
We recently learned a whole lot about WarnerMedia's upcoming streaming service HBO Max, which looks to take on Netflix in the great streaming wars ahead. The service will boast a ton of attractive TV shows such as South Park, a new Game of Thrones prequel, DC movies and TV shows, tons of Warner Bros. blockbuster movies and much more. But now we've learned that lovers of classic cinema may want to pay attention, as a collection of classics will be hitting the service as well.

Over on the HBO Max Twitter account, a large thread previewing what's to come on the service revealed what potential subscribers can expect. Somewhat buried underneath all of that information was the reveal that Turner Classic Movies will be curating a selection of titles for the service, such as Citizen Kane, The Shining and Casablanca, just to name a few.

"We've worked with experts at TCM,
See full article at MovieWeb »
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