Review of Airborne

Airborne (1993)
10/10
Probably the best movie about Rollerblading in Cincinnati ever made...
12 December 2006
Although certainly the writer of this film owes much of his inspiration to Steinbeck and Depression-era authors, it has more than enough substance to stand on its own. In hindsight, Airborne is more than just a high-flyin' roller-blading epic—it is a depiction of the culture wars that exist in our society today. Mitchell represents the coastal "corporate" American coming to the Midwest to pillage its' resources (in this case Cincinnati's finest ladies). Augie is the repressed commoner, perhaps a factory worker, who resents Mitchell at first because of his pedigree and obvious social graces. Wiley is the guy who is striving to make it out his internal strife anyway he can, and shrouds his blatant homosexuality in clever retorts and hooded sweatshirts. Jack is obviously the old farmer, who has seen it all in his day and now is bitter that time is no longer his friend.

However, the "Preps" represent something far more imposing than anything Mitchell brings to the table. They obviously represent Communism. If the Cold War taught us anything, it is that Communism can only be contained by a roller-skating race through Cincinnati that ends at the birthplace of democracy, Riverfront Stadium. No wonder Jack Black jumped at the chance to make this ambitious film. The subtle nuances of this cultured classic cannot fully be appreciated in two or three sittings. Nay, the marrow of this film must be sucked dry before you can truly see the vision behind this movie. Step aside Shakespeare...
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