Movie News

‘Anaconda’ Reboot in the Works at Sony With ‘Divergent’ Writer

‘Anaconda’ Reboot in the Works at Sony With ‘Divergent’ Writer
Sony Pictures is in early development of a reboot of the “Anaconda” franchise, hiring “Divergent” writer Evan Daugherty to write the project.

The studio has not set up the project with a producer, director or actors.

Sony released the original “Anaconda” in 1997 as a horror thriller starring Jennifer Lopez, Ice Cube, Jon Voight, Eric Stoltz and Owen Wilson. Directed by Luis Llosa, the plot centered on Lopez’ character heading a documentary film crew looking for a long-lost tribe along the Amazon River, only to see the expedition taken over by a nefarious snake hunter, played by Voight, leading to several horrific encounters with a massive green serpent.

Anaconda” was a success with a worldwide gross of $135 million on a $45 million budget. That led to a 2004 sequel “Anacondas: The Hunt for the Blood Orchid,” set in Borneo, as the protagonists sought a life-extending flower on a remote island inhabited by deadly snakes.
See full article at Variety - Film News »

‘Bambi’ Live-Action Remake Lands ‘Captain Marvel,’ ‘Chaos Walking’ Writers

  • The Wrap
‘Bambi’ Live-Action Remake Lands ‘Captain Marvel,’ ‘Chaos Walking’ Writers
On the heels of 2019’s “The Lion King,” another Disney animated classic is getting the live-action treatment as “Bambi” has landed the writers behind “Captain Marvel” and “Chaos Walking.”

Disney has hired Geneva Robertson-Dworet and Lindsey Beer to write the script for the live-action remake of the 1942 animated classic.

Depth of Field (“The Farewell”), the production banner run by Chris and Paul Weitz and Andrew Miano, will produce the live action remake.

The original coming of age animated classic centered on a young deer named Bambi who joins his new friends, a rabbit named Thumper and a skunk named Flower, in exploring his forest home. As Bambi grows up, he learns that there is tragedy as well as beauty and joy in his forest world and on the path to adulthood. The film received three Oscar nominations — best song, best score and best sound.

The studio is having major successes
See full article at The Wrap »

Box Office: ‘The Gentlemen’ Opens With $725,000 on Thursday Night

Box Office: ‘The Gentlemen’ Opens With $725,000 on Thursday Night
STX's Matthew McConaughey crime comedy “The Gentlemen” has opened with a moderate $725,000 at 1,885 North American locations on Thursday night.

Horror thriller “The Turning” launched with $425,000 at 2,200 sites on Thursday night. The movie, based on Henry James’ 1898 novella “The Turn of the Screw,” stars Mackenzie Davis, Finn Wolfhard and Brooklynn Prince.

Neither new entry is expected to top Sony’s “Bad Boys for Life,” which has over-performed with $83 million domestically in its first six days. The third installment in the Will Smith-Martin Lawrence franchise beat expectations over the Martin Luther King Jr. holiday with $73 million and could add another $30 million during its second session.

The Gentlemen” has been pegged to earn around $10 million when it debuts in 2,100 theaters. That would be a solid start, since Stx shelled out $7 million to buy U.S. rights from Miramax. McConaughey stars as an American expat looking to cash out of the
See full article at Variety - Film News »

How Sundance Documentary ‘Giving Voice’ Keeps August Wilson’s Legacy Alive

  • Indiewire
How Sundance Documentary ‘Giving Voice’ Keeps August Wilson’s Legacy Alive
August Wilson, Pulitzer Prize-winning writer of “Fences,” “Joe Turner’s Come and Gone,” and more, is one of America’s preeminent playwrights, chronicling the African-American experience with 10 plays, set in different decades of the 20th century. Now, every year, thousands of high-school students from across the country gather on Broadway, in New York City, to perform one of his monologues in an exciting, high-stakes competition.

Premiering at the 2020 Sundance Film Festival, the feature documentary, “Giving Voice,” closely follows the lives of six of the students as they meticulously workshop their individual performances, with the hopes of embodying Wilson’s legacy. The Monologue Competition was featured in the 2012 documentary “The Start of Dreams”, directed by the Horne Brothers, and it told the story of Tony Award-nominated director Kenny Leon, and his efforts to use his celebrity to expose kids across the country to the world of theater. It was also featured
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Impact Partners Executive Director Jenny Raskin on Financing, Fellowships, and Following the Filmmakers’ Lead

From 2018’s feature doc Oscar winner Icarus, to 2019’s Independent Spirit Award for Best Documentary recipient Won’t You Be My Neighbor?, to the Sundance Grand Jury Prize nabbing Of Fathers and Sons and Dina, Impact Partners has been behind some of the most critically acclaimed nonfiction work of recent years. The company’s winning streak, however, actually goes back a decade, all the way to 2010’s Academy Award for Documentary Feature recipient The Cove. And Impact Partners itself goes back even further. Founded in 2007 by Dan Cogan and Geralyn Dreyfous with a mission to bring […]
See full article at Filmmaker Magazine »

“The Walking Stick Is the Object That Ties Their Fates Together”: Cedric Cheung-Lau | The Mountains Are a Dream That Call to Me

Whether capturing or creating a world, the objects onscreen tell as much of a story as the people within it. Whether sourced or accidental, insert shot or background detail, what prop or piece of set decoration do you find particularly integral to your film? What story does it tell? In a film shot in so many wide landscapes, where our characters are sometimes just dots in the space, I think it’s a culmination of tiny details, some which may not even be seen, that gives the film its character and emotion. More overtly and specifically however, the walking stick Tukten […]
See full article at Filmmaker Magazine »

‘Worth’: Film Review

‘Worth’: Film Review
As a child, when future TV host Fred Rogers would see scary images on the news, his mother would tell him, “Look for the heroes.” If Fred were a boy today, she’d add, “Look for Ken Feinberg.” Feinberg, the lawyer at the center of Sara Colangelo’s “Worth,” specializes in putting a price tag on human tragedy. He’s brought his calculator to the shootings in Sandy Hook, Aurora, Virginia Tech and Orlando, and tallied spreadsheets for victims of the Boston Bombing, Bp oil spill, Agent Orange, asbestos, bad breast implants, bad car ignitions, Boeing 737s, Catholic Church and Penn State. Feinberg even haggled the value of the Zapruder Tape.

Here, Colangelo (“The Kindergarten Teacher”) and screenwriter Max Borenstein are only interested in Feinberg’s most famous case: the payout for the September 11th Victim Compensation Fund. The two-year grind involved more than 7,000 families and turned the disaster accountant,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

‘Cybersix’ Review: An Animated Series Worthy of the Wachowskis | Saturday Mourning Cartoons

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6oDPK4YUfDY&feature=youtu.be Listen/download here: In this Listener Recommendation episode, Sean Paul Ellis and Dave Trumbore of Saturday Mourning Cartoons tackle the internationally produced 1999 animated action series, Cybersix. The unique show with an incredible international talent pool centered on the title character, a female android masquerading as a male literature teacher by day and a black-clad superhero by night. It's got mutants, it's got Nazis, it's got a compelling character with Lgbtq elements that makes for an interesting and modern story more than 20 years later. …
See full article at Collider.com »

“A Celebration of the Pure-Hearted Passion of Amateurs”: Euros Lyn | Dream Horse

Whether capturing or creating a world, the objects onscreen tell as much of a story as the people within it. Whether sourced or accidental, insert shot or background detail, what prop or piece of set decoration do you find particularly integral to your film? What story does it tell? These are highly prized plates, awarded to the fastest bird in a pigeon race. Jan Vokes, the heroine of Dream Horse, bred several winning racing pigeons, a skill she transferred to breed a champion racehorse in her backyard. “Pigeon fancying,” as it’s known colloquially, is open to all and is a […]
See full article at Filmmaker Magazine »

“We Took an Airboat to the Middle of That Truly Unique Geographic Expanse of Subtropical Wilderness”: Kim A. Snyder | Us Kids

Whether capturing or creating a world, the objects onscreen tell as much of a story as the people within it. Whether sourced or accidental, insert shot or background detail, what prop or piece of set decoration do you find particularly integral to your film? What story does it tell? There is a scene towards the end of the film we shot in the Everglades, a place that Emma Gonzalez explained to me which represents a nostalgic and calming sense of security for her from childhood. David Hogg, after having received death threats, […]
See full article at Filmmaker Magazine »

“I’m a Massive Expert on Horses”: Editor Jamie Pearson on Dream Horse

Welsh director Euros Lyn adapts a true story about one woman’s determination to prove people wrong in Dream Horse, starring Toni Collette as Jan, a waitress who suddenly takes up the challenge of breeding a racehorse, with both skeptics and supporters by her side. Sure enough, Dream Alliance, the horse and the syndicate, become horse racing champions. Editor Jamie Pearson explains how he came up in the industry, how the narrative for Dream Horse was shaped and also divulges a few spoilers. “ Filmmaker: How and why did you wind up being the editor of your film? What were the […]
See full article at Filmmaker Magazine »

‘I fell in love with The Magus as a teenager’: Sam Mendes on going from wartime trenches to Greek idyll

The award-winning 1917 director tells why his Neal Street Production company is adapting John Fowles’s 60s novel for TV

A small Greek island, its wooded hills woven with timeless secrets, would make a welcome contrast to the carnage of first world war trenches. But if 1917 director Sir Sam Mendes now has a holiday isle near Athens in his sights, it is as the location of his next project, and not as a sunny destination before he is feted at Bafta and Oscar ceremonies next month.

Mendes and his partners at Neal Street Productions are to make a major television adaptation of The Magus, the mysterious and much-loved novel by John Fowles. “Like many people, I read and loved it as a teenager,” Mendes said this weekend, as he unveiled his latest plans to the Observer.
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

From fake maps to golden tickets: the film props of artist Annie Atkins

When film-makers need a detailed artefact, they go to the in-demand Welsh creator, whose work is celebrated in a new book

See a gallery of Annie Atkins’s props

Bringing Wes Anderson’s vision for The Grand Budapest Hotel to life seems to have been a labour of love for all involved. For none more so, perhaps, than props designer Annie Atkins, for whom the shoot involved conjuring up the visual infrastructure of an entire fictional nation – flags and coats of arms, banknotes and postage stamps, police reports and newspapers – from scratch. Now a book allows Atkins to share, among other things, how she created the film’s sweetly sinister, somewhere-in-time, somewhere-in-Europe wonderland; an aesthetic remixed from the vintage passports and tattered train tickets, Stasi stationery and children’s diaries that she found during her research.

It’s a long way to Zubrowka from the small village of Dolwyddelan, in north Wales,
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

‘All the Sins’ Producers to Broaden Spanish-Language Ties (Exclusive)

‘All the Sins’ Producers to Broaden Spanish-Language Ties (Exclusive)
GÖTEBORG, Sweden: “All the Sins”’ Finnish co-writers and creators Mika Ronkainen and Merja Aakko, winners of last year’s Nordisk Film & TV Fond Prize for outstanding Nordic screenplay, are developing for Mrk Matila Röhr Productions an adoption drama set between Finland and Guatemala.

Based on a true story, the six-part series “Act of Telling” (a working title) will examine child adoption through the story of a young Finnish couple and their Guatemala-born son. The respectable father has harbored a secret for seven years -a crime he committed when he travelled alone for the adoption. When a journalist friend starts to ask questions about the son’s biological parents, the mystery threatens to come to light.

Producer Ilkka Matilä said that Finnish public broadcaster Yle has ordered the concept from the writing duo. He’s now looking for a “potential co-production partner who could facilitate the Guatemala shoot.”

In early development,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

The Lighthouse director Robert Eggers on storms, seagulls and spraying Robert Pattinson with a hose

His unorthodox methods saw his leading man nearly punch him in the face. But the end result is one of the past year’s most acclaimed films

This is getting very granular for me,” says Robert Eggers, half-jokingly, half-uncomfortably. We were talking about Eggers’s obsession with history, but somehow we have drifted on to his childhood habit of dressing up in costumes. “My mom would take me to [Us clothing chain] Joann Fabrics and buy some Lycra for me, and I would hand-sew a Wolverine costume that would look quite lumpy but serviceable.” He would often go to school as a superhero or Captain Hook or Abraham Lincoln. The teachers were supportive. But when he was 11 or 12, some of the other kids beat him up for his unconventional dress sense. “Then I decided to get very invested in dressing cool, which is something, unfortunately, now I’m still conscious of. So that
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

‘Vivos’: Film Review

‘Vivos’: Film Review
To the individual enduring it, sorrow seems a lonely, defenseless emotion, one from which others are too quick to look away. Shared and felt en masse, however, it can become something different: a galvanizing force, a wall, not diminished in pain but not diminished by it either. Ai Weiwei’s stirring new documentary “Vivos” runs on a vast, roiling current of such sorrow. Portraying the devastated families of 49 Mexican students in the Guerrero region who were either killed or forcibly disappeared following a police raid, it’s a study of grief both in unresolved limbo and in determined action — thwarted either way by a national scourge of institutional corruption that the public is forced to take as given.

Unspooling in Sundance’s non-competitive Documentary Premieres strand, “Vivos” represents a slight departure from the Chinese artist-activist’s last two feature-length docs, “The Rest” and “Human Flow,” both of which took on
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Sundance: Benedict Cumberbatch, Michael Keaton Movies Premiere Without Either Actor in Attendance

Sundance: Benedict Cumberbatch, Michael Keaton Movies Premiere Without Either Actor in Attendance
On the second night of this year’s Sundance Film Festival, two high-profile dramas premiered to packed houses at the Eccles Theater — but neither of them had a seat reserved for their lead actors.

Ironbark,” a historical drama about a mild-mannered businessman turned spy for the British government during the Cold War, didn’t have its star Benedict Cumberbatch in attendance.

“Worth,” the story of a lawyer in charge of the 9/11 Victim Compensation Fund, was also missing its leading man Michael Keaton.

Both actors are overseas filming other projects during Sundance. However, they still sent word through two different mediums.

Cumberbatch, who is in New Zealand shooting Jane Campion’s film “The Power of the Dog,” recorded a short video that played before his movie. “I have always wanted to go to Sundance,” he said in the message, shot against the backdrop of green shrubs. “I really hope you enjoy ‘Ironbark.
See full article at Variety - Film News »

‘The Dissident’ Review: Murdered Journalist Jamal Khashoggi’s Tragic Fate Is a Somber Call to Action

When Washington Post columnist Jamal Khashoggi was murdered at the Saudi consulate in Istanbul in 2018, the global outrage was instantaneous. Nevertheless, a year and a half later, the murky circumstances behind his death remain a source of constant speculation, and despite the Saudi Arabian government’s decision to execute several unidentified men for the crime, it remains unclear just how much justice has been served.

Khashoggi’s death almost certainly stemmed from his criticism of the Saudi Arabian government, and the idea that Crown Prince Muhammad bin Salman had no idea about it simply doesn’t stand up to scrutiny. “The Dissident,” documentarian Bryan Fogel’s somber recap of the circumstances surrounding the tragic event, presents

Unlike Fogel’s Oscar-winning Olympics doping exposé “Icarus,” the new documentary focuses less on new information than condensing and making sense of the situation as it stands. It makes up for a dry and
See full article at Indiewire »

Streaming: where to find the best Jokers in the pack

Phoenix’s hypnotic psychopath, available to stream from next week, joins the brotherhood of those who have worn the supervillain’s painted smile – plus other compelling loners

To call Joker “the gift that keeps on giving” runs somewhat counter to the general spirit of Todd Phillips’s nihilistic supervillain spectacle: perhaps it’s the thief that keeps taking instead. Either way, it’s a film that refuses to go away. The better part of the autumn was spent debating the artistry and politics of an unusually polarising, pessimistic blockbuster as it laughed its way to a billion dollars worldwide. Just as the discussion threatened to die down, the film surprised everyone (and infuriated many) by leading the Oscar and Bafta nominations. So the pop-cultural litigation of a comic-book movie continues – just in time for its streaming release on Monday.

I’m a Joker admirer, I admit – and not just for
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

‘Ironbark’ Review: Benedict Cumberbatch Gets His Own ‘Bridge of Spies’ in a Decent Historical Dad Movie

‘Ironbark’ Review: Benedict Cumberbatch Gets His Own ‘Bridge of Spies’ in a Decent Historical Dad Movie
While not quite as stiff as its title might suggest, Dominic Cooke’s “Ironbark” is unambiguously dad cinema down to its core. , it’s the perfect movie for anyone who watched “Bridge of Spies” and thought: “If only that had been 30 minutes shorter, a bit less artful, and a lot more British.” Never fear, the director of “On Chesil Beach” is here, and he’s naturally brought along Benedict Cumberbatch for good measure.

Holding a magnifying glass to a remarkable (but rather unheralded) footnote of Cold War history, “Ironbark” tells the story of how two men from opposite sides of the Iron Curtain forged a bond that would help avert nuclear armageddon. Cooke’s lean version of events begins in the heart of the Soviet Union circa the autumn of 1960, when a war hero and military intelligence colonel by the name of Oleg Penkovsky has become so desperate to de-escalate
See full article at Indiewire »
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