Grandmaster Flash - News Poster

News

New York State Contributes $3.7 Million to Universal Hip Hop Museum in Bronx

The state of New York announced Thursday that it would contribute $3.7 million to the Universal Hip Hop Museum, a $80 million institution dedicated to the musical genre set to open in the Bronx in 2023.

Governor Andrew Cuomo officially signed off on the $3.7 million grant as part of a larger package of economic and community development funding statewide, CNN reports.

The Universal Hip Hop Museum, dubbed the first-ever museum dedicated to rap music, is currently operating as a pop-up exhibit in the Bronx Terminal Market ahead of its planned move to the
See full article at Rolling Stone »

Witness the birth of Mexico's drug war in the new Narcos: Mexico trailer

  • JoBlo
Roll up your dollar bills, clear your snoots, and get ready to take on the brand-new trailer for Narcos: Mexico, my friends. Today, Netflix has debuted a hard-as-nails look at the upcoming fourth season of the biographical crime drama that chronicles the Mexican drug war that began in the 1980s. Set to the tune of Grandmaster Flash’s “White Lines”, the…
See full article at JoBlo »

‘Narcos: Mexico’ Trailer: Michael Peña and Diego Luna Kickstart Reset of Netflix Drug Trade Drama

For their next stop in dramatizing the international illicit drug trade, Netflix is going back closer to the beginning. “Narcos: Mexico,” the impending offshoot of the streaming service’s long running Pablo Escobar-centered series, is taking its story from Colombia to Guadalajara and bringing an impressive cast with it.

After three years of the original “Narcos” that encompassed Escobar’s rise and downfall, this fourth season of the show goes back in time to start at the outset of the 1980s. Diego Luna stars as Félix Gallardo, another real-life figure in the annals of illegal drug trafficking, who created the Guadalajara Cartel. On the other side of this pursuit is the DEA’s Kiki Camarena (Michael Peña), trying to balance his family life with an expanded pursuit of Gallardo through Mexico.

As far as on-the-nose music cues for trailers go, Grandmaster Flash’s “White Lines” in the one below
See full article at Indiewire »

‘Saturday Night Live’ Review: Chance The Rapper Charms His Way Through The Season’s Best

  • Indiewire
‘Saturday Night Live’ Review: Chance The Rapper Charms His Way Through The Season’s Best
The biggest shock to come from this week’s episode of “Saturday Night Live” is that Chance The Rapper can apparently exist without his signature hat. He might even thrive without it, which is a fascinating reality to accept. The point is, with or without the hat, Chance The Rapper hosts the best episode of this season so far, the first one to maintain a consistently good quality from top to bottom as well as successfully use the host to their strengths. In fact, Chance The Rapper showed signs in this episode of being the next Justin Timberlake for “Saturday Night Live” in terms of his versatility, gameness, and general sense of humor as a host.

The second biggest shock is that, despite the opening monologue, the “Family Feud” sketch, and some Weekend Update, this year’s Thanksgiving episode is not tied down to the concept of being a Thanksgiving episode.
See full article at Indiewire »

The Tragedy of Kidd Creole: A Rap Pioneer’s Descent into Alleged Murder

The Tragedy of Kidd Creole: A Rap Pioneer’s Descent into Alleged Murder
He was part of the pioneering hip hop collective Grandmaster Flash & the Furious Five, the first rappers to be inducted into the Rock ‘n’ Roll Hall of Fame. Now Kidd Creole is in jail for allegedly stabbing a homeless ex-con during a late night scuffle on the streets of Manhattan. His tumultuous life had taken him from thrilling crowds at Madison Square Garden to making ends meet by working odd jobs as a security guard and handyman, but few could have predicted his descent into murder.

Kidd Creole was born Nathaniel Glover Jr. on Feb. 19, 1960, and grew up in the south Bronx.
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

‘The Get Down’: How Baz Luhrmann and Flash Recreated Hip-Hop in the Bronx

‘The Get Down’: How Baz Luhrmann and Flash Recreated Hip-Hop in the Bronx
For production designer Karen Murphy and composer Elliott Wheeler, “The Get Down” was a far cry from the fantastical liberties taken with “The Great Gatsby.” Fulfilling Baz Luhrmann’s ambitious vision — recreating the rise of hip-hop in the burned-out wasteland of the late ’70s South Bronx — required a special authenticity. They had to immerse themselves in the revolutionary time and place before mastering “The Get Down,” inspired by hip-hop DJing, cutting, and mixing legend Grandmaster Flash.

The expensive musical extravaganza (cancelled by Netflix after its first season) was a wild convergence of music, politics, and rebellion. The series not only focused on teens from the South Bronx with larger aspirations than graffiti art, who become “The Get Down Brothers,” but complicated their lives with an unrequited love story, hampered by disapproving parents.

A Bronx Tale

Murphy first took inspiration from the South Bronx photo exhibit, “Seis Del Sur: Dispatches from Home,
See full article at Indiewire »

Netflix cancels The Get Down

Netflix has announced it will not be renewing Baz Luhrmann’s The Get Down for a second season, Deadline has revealed.

The Get Down recently aired the second part of its first season on the streaming service last month, with the first being made available last August.

The reasons for its cancellation are apparently because of its budget – the first season cost $120 million, one of Netflix’s most expensive shows – as well as a slew of changes to its writers and showrunners and, significantly, Luhrmann’s limited involvement in the potential second season.

While he had a lot of input as a showrunner in its first season, Luhrmann was getting ready to dive back into a new cinematic project. The fact he would not be readily available for a second season seems to have been the most contributing factor for its cancellation.

In a lengthy Facebook post, Luhrmann said: “When
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Netflix series The Get Down reportedly axed as Baz Luhrmann says he will focus on film

Australian director describes hip-hop show’s revival as unlikely and says ‘the simple truth is, I make movies’

The Netflix series The Get Down has been cancelled after just one two-part season, according to Variety, with director Baz Luhrmann taking to Facebook to describe an exclusivity deal that became a “sticking point” for Netflix and Sony Pictures Television, precluding him from working on a new film project.

The show – an extravagant Us$120m retelling of the founding of hip-hop, executive produced by Grandmaster Flash and narrated by the rapper Nas – was plagued by a revolving door of crew and beset by a series of delays. By the time it premiered in August 2017, to a polarised critical reception, it had become the most expensive series in Netflix’s history; but when part two debuted in April, the buzz had largely died down.

Related: That auteur do it: can big name directors
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Netflix series The Get Down reportedly axed as Baz Luhrmann says he will focus on film

Australian director describes hip-hop show’s revival as unlikely and says ‘the simple truth is, I make movies’

The Netflix series The Get Down has been cancelled after just one two-part season, according to Variety, with director Baz Luhrmann taking to Facebook to describe an exclusivity deal that became a “sticking point” for Netflix and Sony Pictures Television, precluding him from working on a new film project.

The show – an extravagant Us$120m retelling of the founding of hip-hop, executive produced by Grandmaster Flash and narrated by the rapper Nas – was plagued by a revolving door of crew and beset by a series of delays. By the time it premiered in August 2017, to a polarised critical reception, it had become the most expensive series in Netflix’s history; but when part two debuted in April, the buzz had largely died down.

Continue reading...
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Netflix Cancels ‘The Get Down’ — Read Baz Luhrmann’s Goodbye Message to Fans

Netflix Cancels ‘The Get Down’ — Read Baz Luhrmann’s Goodbye Message to Fans
Netflix is bidding goodbye to the Bronx.

According to a report from Deadline, “The Get Down” will not be returning for a second season.

Originally conceived by show co-creator Baz Luhrmann, who directed the pilot, the ambitious drama followed a group of young aspiring artists in the Bronx during the ascension of hip hop. Set in the 1970s, the show also worked in plots of family, faith and political corruption.

Read More: ‘The Get Down’ Season 1 Will Change the Way You Binge Netflix

It’s hardly a secret how much the show cost to produce, with some budget estimates ballooning as high as $120 million. Though the first season of “The Get Down” contained 12 episodes in total, Netflix released the series in a pair of six-episode “parts,” the second of which debuted this past April.

Boasting a strong cast that included Giancarlo Esposito, Jimmy Smits, Daveed Diggs, Jaden Smith and an
See full article at Indiewire »

Awards Race Disruption: Why ‘Get Out’ and Netflix Can Afford to Rewrite the Rules

Isn’t May a little early to launch an Oscar campaign? Not anymore. These days, it seems old rules don’t apply. On Tuesday evening, Universal marketing turned its “Get Out” DVD launch party into an ad-hoc awards event, inviting awards journalists to its Wisteria Lane backlot to celebrate Jordan Peele’s horror comedy about suburbia gone very wrong.

At $174 million to date (and an expected $50 million bonus rolling out overseas), “Get Out” is Blumhouse horror producer Jason Blum’s highest-grossing film (and his second Oscar contender, after “Whiplash”). And no one is more surprised to be in the awards conversation than breakout writer-director Peele, who is developing seven more original ideas for his new Universal first-look deal. Chances are, he’ll get more than $4.5 million to make them.

Being in any awards race is “a little surreal to me,” Peele told me. “I have a hard time accepting that’s part of the conversation.
See full article at Indiewire »

Awards Race Disruption: Why ‘Get Out’ and Netflix Can Afford to Rewrite the Rules

Isn’t May a little early to launch an Oscar campaign? Not anymore. These days, it seems old rules don’t apply. On Tuesday evening, Universal marketing turned its “Get Out” DVD launch party into an ad-hoc awards event, inviting awards journalists to its Wisteria Lane backlot to celebrate Jordan Peele’s horror comedy about suburbia gone very wrong.

At $174 million to date (and an expected $50 million bonus rolling out overseas), “Get Out” is Blumhouse horror producer Jason Blum’s highest-grossing film (and his second Oscar contender, after “Whiplash”). And no one is more surprised to be in the awards conversation than breakout writer-director Peele, who is developing seven more original ideas for his new Universal first-look deal. Chances are, he’ll get more than $4.5 million to make them.

Being in any awards race is “a little surreal to me,” Peele told me. “I have a hard time accepting that’s part of the conversation.
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

Composer Elliott Wheeler jams with Grandmaster Flash on 'The Get Down'

Elliott Wheeler.

Aussie Elliott Wheeler is the composer on Baz Luhrmann's Netflix series about the death of disco and rise of hip-hop, 'The Get Down'. Wheeler.s duties included producing and coordinating all the music heard in the show as well as writing his own.

How did you get the Get Down gig?.

Baz and I started working together on The Great Gatsby, and then we did the live musical version of Strictly Ballroom. After that finished I moved over to the States to set up there. Baz had mentioned that The Get Down was coming up, and a few months after that I moved over to New York to start working on the show..

What was his brief when he spoke to you?

Just because of the scope of the show and the amount of music that was going to be involved, we wanted to create
See full article at IF.com.au »

Watch the Lively New Trailer for 'The Get Down' Part II

Watch the Lively New Trailer for 'The Get Down' Part II
Netflix has unveiled the release date for The Get Down's next set of episodes. The show's "Part II" will premiere this spring. The network announced the return of Baz Luhrmann and Stephen Adly Guirgis' hip-hop drama via a short trailer.

In the brief 15-second clip, lively performance scenes are interwoven with audience clips, a motorcycle ride and DJ shots. "We're going to take our music from minor to major league," a voiceover says.

Set in the late 1970s in the South Bronx, the show recreates the fictionalized moments
See full article at Rolling Stone »

Sundance Films Reveal Their Casting Secrets: 26 Filmmakers Tell Us How They Did It — Sundance 2017

  • Indiewire
Sundance Films Reveal Their Casting Secrets: 26 Filmmakers Tell Us How They Did It — Sundance 2017
From working with non-professionals to writing roles for specific actors to hiring a top casting director, there is no one way to find a great cast for an independent film. IndieWire checked in with the Dramatic Competition and Next directors of Sundance 2017 to find out their secrets.

Read More: The 2017 IndieWire Sundance Bible: Every Review, Interview and News Item Posted During the Festival

Gillian Robespierre, “LandlineJenny Slate was attached from the beginning. I wrote the role of Donna in “Obvious Child” for Jenny, and when sitting down to write the next project it was a no-brainer to write another role for her. We then built the family around her with the help of two incredible casting directors, Doug Aibel and Stephanie Holbrook.

Zoe Lister-Jones, “Band Aid” Almost all the actors in the film were either friends or people I had personal connections to, so it was a relatively easy process.
See full article at Indiewire »

Netflix’s ‘The Get Down’ Costs Have Gone Up, To About $16M Per Episode

Exclusive: The Get Down was expected to be an expensive proposition from the get-go and Netflix knew it. The series from Academy Award-winning husband-wife team of Baz Luhrmann and Catherine Martin, Pulitzer-winning playwright Stephen Adly Guirgis, hip-hop historian Nelson George and iconic rappers Mc Nas and Grandmaster Flash was expected to cost around $11 million per episode for 12 episodes, which all-in would have totaled about $120M. However, Deadline has learned…
See full article at Deadline TV »

Inside 'The Get Down': How Baz Luhrmann Recreated the Birth of Hip-Hop

Inside 'The Get Down': How Baz Luhrmann Recreated the Birth of Hip-Hop
Baz Luhrmann's resplendent, hyperactive Netflix series The Get Down documents hip-hop in the days before it was truly documented. A colorful, graffiti-strewn 1977 Bronx tableau about a gifted, lovesick poet named Ezekiel (Justice Smith) who finds himself drawn into the burgeoning culture exploding at block parties, the series sets the action years before docudramas like Wild Style, Kurtis Blow's performance of "The Breaks" on Soul Train and rap was etched to vinyl — even before landmark pieces like Robert Ford Jr.'s Billboard breakdown "Jive Talking N.Y. DJs" started
See full article at Rolling Stone »

Review: ‘The Get Down’ Season 1 Will Change the Way You Binge Netflix

Review: ‘The Get Down’ Season 1 Will Change the Way You Binge Netflix
Many filmmakers who transition to television describe the switch as a simple one, usually using a phrase to the effect of, “It’s just a 10-hour movie.” They pretend — and I do mean pretend — that the only difference between what they made for the cinema and what they’re doing for television is the literal length of time they have with the characters.

This, however, is a lie; a lie often innocently told to toss aside a question with a much more complex answer, but still a lie. For the truth is, TV seasons aren’t just longer movies. They’re not novels, either (another popular, but only slightly more accurate simile). They’re TV shows, and they’re designed that way… that is, until “The Get Down.”

Read More: Review: ‘The Get Down’ is the Baz Luhrmann Movie You’ve Been Waiting For Since ‘Moulin Rouge!’

What first strikes you is the length.
See full article at Indiewire »

The Get Down review – Baz Luhrmann’s hip-hop drama needs a remix

Set in the South Bronx in the late 70s, the first episode of this myth-making drama is kaleidescopic and thrilling – but it can’t maintain the pace

At one point during the first episode of The Get Down, Netflix’s new drama by Moulin Rouge director Baz Luhrmann and Stephen Adly Guirgis, it becomes clear that the show is doing something very similar to Hamilton, still the hottest show and toughest ticket on Broadway. Just as Hamilton uses hip-hop and a multiethnic cast to recast the story of American history, The Get Down uses American history and a multiethnic cast to recast the story of hip-hop history. In the bravura first episode, the foundations of rap music laid out in the South Bronx in 1977 are retold as an epic quest, a hero’s journey, a sci-fi epic of marauding gangs taking over a bombed-out landscape.

Related: Why Baz Luhrmann’s
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »
An error has occured. Please try again.

See also

Credited With |  External Sites


Recently Viewed