One of Us (2017) - News Poster

(IV) (2017)

News

“To Dominate out of Fear is Our Worst Characteristic as Humans”: Heidi Ewing and Rachel Grady on Their Oscar-Shortlisted One of Us

Directing partners Heidi Ewing and Rachel Grady — selected for Filmmaker‘s 25 New Faces in 2005 — first came on to the filmmaking scene with heartfelt documentaries The Boys of Baraka and Oscar-nominated Jesus Camp. In their latest documentary One of Us, currently available on Netflix and just shortlisted for the Best Documentary Academy Award, their signature cinema verite style of filmmaking unveiled a level of suspense and drama they were not expecting. Centered around three people who are attempting to leave the tight reigns of their New York-based Hasidic Jewish communities, the film goes deep inside an overly controlling, […]
See full article at Filmmaker Magazine »

“Unrest,” “One of Us,” and Other Women-Directed Documentaries Advance in Oscar Race

Unrest

The Oscar race is heating up. The Academy has narrowed down the films in the running for Documentary Feature to 15, and four of them are directed or co-directed by women, amounting to about 27 percent of the pool.

The short list includes Heidi Ewing and Rachel Grady’s “One of Us,” an intimate look into the lives of three individuals who chose to leave or were pushed out of their insular Hasidic community, and Jennifer Brea’s “Unrest,” which sees the filmmaker exploring her own medical mystery. “When I was 28, I was a PhD student at Harvard and engaged to the love of my life. Then I came down with a terrible fever,” Brea recounted to us. “Although doctors told me my symptoms were ‘all in my head,’ I grew progressively more ill, and within months I was unable even to sit in a wheelchair.”

Also featured is “Faces Places,
See full article at Women and Hollywood »

Oscar Best Documentary shortlist announced by Anne-Katrin Titze - 2017-12-08 11:38:08

Jane Goodall with Jane director Brett Morgen Photo: Anne-Katrin Titze

Abacus: Small Enough To Jail, directed by Steve James; Jeff Orlowski's Chasing Coral; Matthew Heineman's City Of Ghosts; Frederick Wiseman's Ex Libris: New York Public Library; Agnès Varda and Jr's Faces Places; Ai Weiwei's Human Flow; Bonni Cohen and Jon Shenk's An Inconvenient Sequel: Truth To Power; Brett Morgen's Jane; Daniel Lindsay and Tj Martin's La 92; Firas Fayyad and Steen Johannessen's Last Men In Aleppo; Amir Bar-Lev's Long Strange Trip; Heidi Ewing and Rachel Grady's One Of Us; Yance Ford's Strong Island, and Jennifer Brea's Unrest are another step closer to garnering a Best Documentary Oscar nomination.

The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences' Documentary Branch determined the shortlist in a preliminary round of voting on the 170 submitted titles. Documentary Branch members will now select
See full article at eyeforfilm.co.uk »

Shortlist for Oscars® Nominated Docu Features

Shortlist for Oscars® Nominated Docu Features
The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences today announced that 15 films in the Documentary Feature category will advance in the voting process for the 90th Academy Awards®. One hundred seventy films were originally submitted in the category.

The 15 films are listed below in alphabetical order by title, with their production companies:

Abacus: Small Enough to Jail, Mitten Media, Motto Pictures, Kartemquin Educational Films and Wgbh/Frontline.

Director Steve James

A small financial institution called Abacus becomes the only company criminally indicted in the wake of the United States’ 2008 mortgage crisis.

Chasing Coral, Exposure Labs in partnership with The Ocean Agency & View Into the Blue in association with Argent Pictures & The Kendeda Fund. Directed by Jeff Orlowski

Coral reefs around the world are vanishing at an unprecedented rate. A team of divers, photographers and scientists set out on a thrilling ocean adventure to discover why and to reveal the underwater mystery to the world.
See full article at Sydney's Buzz »

“Don’t Judge Your Footage in the Field”: Tips on Doc Verite Shooting From the Camerafolk Behind One of Us, The Judge, and E-Team

Vérité cinema is frequently tossed about as a term, and likely most of us know the broader strokes of the genre: an observational camera whose team aims not to interfere with the subjects or action; a film frequently built on intimate access, shunning sit down interviews or use of archival footage. At a November 12 Doc NYC Pro panel dubbed “Observational Camera,” five respected filmmakers reflected on the specifics of how they go about shooting direct cinema. Heidi Ewing and Rachel Grady’s One of Us follows three individuals who leave an ultra-Orthodox Jewish community, and on the panel were cinematographers Jenni […]
See full article at Filmmaker Magazine »

Producers Guild of America Documentary Nominations Don’t Foreshadow the Oscars

Producers Guild of America Documentary Nominations Don’t Foreshadow the Oscars
With a wide field of potential contenders, the Producers Guild of America made some surprise picks and snubs for its seven nominees for Best Feature Documentary on Monday. The films nominated for the Award for Outstanding Producer of Documentary Motion Pictures are listed below in alphabetical order:

Chasing Coral” (Jeff Orlowski, Netflix)

City of Ghosts” (Mattew Heineman, Amazon)

Cries from Syria” (Evgeny Afineevsky, HBO)

Earth: One Amazing Day” (Peter Webber, Lixin Fan, Richard Dale, BBC Earth)

Jane” (Brett Morgen, NatGeo)

Joshua: Teenager vs. Superpower” (Joe Piscatella, Netflix)

The Newspaperman: The Life and Times of Ben Bradlee” (John Maggio, HBO)

Among the lauded documentaries left off the 2017 PGA nominations were Cannes documentary winner “Faces Places,” directed by Agnes Varda and Jr, Heidi Ewing and Rachel Grady’s portrait of Brooklyn Hassidim, “One of Us,” and popular Turkish cat documentary “Kedi.”

While the PGA’s feature nominees often align with Oscar contenders,
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

Producers Guild of America Documentary Nominations Don’t Foreshadow the Oscars

  • Indiewire
Producers Guild of America Documentary Nominations Don’t Foreshadow the Oscars
With a wide field of potential contenders, the Producers Guild of America made some surprise picks and snubs for its seven nominees for Best Feature Documentary on Monday. The films nominated for the Award for Outstanding Producer of Documentary Motion Pictures are listed below in alphabetical order:

Chasing Coral” (Jeff Orlowski, Netflix)

City of Ghosts” (Mattew Heineman, Amazon)

Cries from Syria” (Evgeny Afineevsky, HBO)

Earth: One Amazing Day” (Peter Webber, Lixin Fan, Richard Dale, BBC Earth)

Jane” (Brett Morgen, NatGeo)

Joshua: Teenager vs. Superpower” (Joe Piscatella, Netflix)

“The Newspaperman: The Life and Times of Ben Bradlee” (John Maggio, HBO)

Among the lauded documentaries left off the 2017 PGA nominations were Cannes documentary winner “Faces Places,” directed by Agnes Varda and Jr, Heidi Ewing and Rachel Grady’s portrait of Brooklyn Hassidim, “One of Us,” and popular Turkish cat documentary “Kedi.”

While the PGA’s feature nominees often align with Oscar contenders,
See full article at Indiewire »

‘Cries From Syria,’ ‘Jane’ Among Producers Guild of America’s Feature Documentary Nominees

‘Cries From Syria,’ ‘Jane’ Among Producers Guild of America’s Feature Documentary Nominees
The Producers Guild of America has nominated seven films for its top documentary award — “Chasing Coral,” “City of Ghosts,” “Cries From Syria,” “Earth: One Amazing Day,” “Jane,” “Joshua: Teenager vs. Superpower” and “The Newspaperman: The Life and Times of Ben Bradlee.”

The winner will be named Jan. 20 at the 29th annual Producers Guild Awards at the Beverly Hilton Hotel. The PGA is a trade group with more than 8,100 members. The organization has not yet determined the producers of the nominated films.

Nominations in the other film and TV categories will be announced Jan. 5. “O.J.: Made in America” won the PGA’s documentary award this year for Ezra Edelman and Caroline Waterlow, then went on to win the Academy Award.

Chasing Coral” explores the disappearance of coral reefs and is directed by Jeff Orlowski. It premiered at the Sundance Film Festival and was released by Neflix in July.

City of Ghosts” centers on the Syrian media activist group Raqqa
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Doc NYC 2017 Women Directors: Meet Geeta Gandbhir — “Armed With Faith”

“Armed With Faith”

Geeta Gandbhir is a prolific director, editor, and producer. She has co-directed numerous award-winning films, including “I Am Evidence,” “Prison Dogs,” “Remembering the Artist, Robert De Niro, Sr.” and “A Journey of A Thousand Miles: Peacekeepers.” She is also currently co-directing and co-producing a “Conversation on Race” series with The New York Times Op-Docs.

“Armed With Faith” will premiere at the 2017 Doc NYC film festival on November 12. The film is co-directed by Asad Faruqi.

W&H: Describe the film for us in your own words.

Gg: After 9/11, Pakistan, which is an American ally in the global war on terror, is plagued by both homegrown and international terrorism. The small yet heroic Pakistani Bomb Disposal Unit is on the frontline of defense defusing bombs, navigating land mines, and grappling with suicide bombers, all while dealing with financial hardship and familial pressure. Harrowing and suspenseful, “Armed With Faith” takes us on the ground with this dedicated squad of men who risk their own lives every day for their country.

W&H: What drew you to this story?

Gg: Asad Faruqi brought this story to me in 2014. We were working together on a film that Sharmeen Obaid-Chinoy and I were directing, and he showed me some footage he had shot. I was immediately impressed by the men of the Kpk Bomb Disposal Unit — their bravery, wisdom, and empathy.

Sharmeen’s and my work is often vested in challenging false, harmful structural and systemic narratives that keep us isolated from each other as human beings and world citizens, and I felt strongly that the stories of these men, who face death every day to protect their communities and homeland, would resonate with a global audience.

W&H: What do you want people to think about when they are leaving the theater?

Gg: I hope people leave with a greater empathy for the struggle of the people of northern Pakistan and their fight to curb extremism, and the understanding and that we all play a part in their successes or failures. I hope people leave with a strong narrative that serves as a counterpoint to the racist, xenophobic, anti- Muslim sentiments and legislation espoused by our current government.

I also hope they leave with a renewed sense that all human beings, no matter where they live and what religion they practice, ultimately want and deserve the same things — peace, security, dignity, and a hopeful future for their children. I also hope they leave with a sense having been deeply moved by a powerful film!

W&H: What was the biggest challenge in making the film?

Gg: The logistics were challenging as the film was shot in northern Pakistan. Also, finding translators for the various languages spoken was not so easy.

W&H: How did you get your film funded? Share some insights into how you got the film made.

Gg: We received a grant from the Idfa/Bertha Brit Doc Journalism Fund and we were also funded by the Independent Television Service (Itvs) — and we are so grateful to them for their support.

W&H: What does it mean for you to have your film play at Doc NYC?

Gg: It means the world! I am a Doc NYC alumni and this is one of my favorite festivals. This is one of the few Us festivals that truly embraces diversity and international films — the curation is superb. It’s also just wonderful for all the hometown folks to have a chance to attend and celebrate. We feel lucky and honored to be part Doc NYC’s vision.

W&H: What’s the best and worst advice you’ve received?

Gg: The best was that each film has its place in the world. There is a festival and a distribution outlet for every film.

The worst advice: Pay yourself later. That never happens!

W&H: What advice do you have for other female directors?

Gg: Demand for yourself what a white, male colleague would demand. If you accept less, you will be given less.

W&H: Name your favorite woman-directed film and why.

Gg: This is an impossible question! As of recent I liked “The Cinema Travellers” by Shirley Abraham (and Amit Madheshiya), Kirsten Johnson’s “Cameraperson,” Smriti Mundhra and Sarita Khurana’s “A Suitable Girl,” and Heidi Ewing and Rachel Grady’s “One of Us.” Those are only some that I can think of right now.

W&H: There have been significant conversations over the last couple of years about increasing the amount of opportunities for women directors yet the numbers have not increased. Are you optimistic about the possibilities for change? Share any thoughts you might have on this topic.

Gg: I am optimistic. I do see change coming. However, we cannot stop making noise about it — we can’t rest. The patriarchy won’t shift on it’s own. We have stay loud and in everyone’s face until there is equality and dignity for everyone in our industry.

Doc NYC 2017 Women Directors: Meet Geeta Gandbhir — “Armed With Faith” was originally published in Women and Hollywood on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.
See full article at Women and Hollywood »

With Sexual Assault Rattling the Industry, ‘Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri’ Is an Angry Feminist Response

With Sexual Assault Rattling the Industry, ‘Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri’ Is an Angry Feminist Response
When playwright-turned-filmmaker Martin McDonagh first conceived of his dark comedy “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri,” in which Frances McDormand plays a woman seeking justice for the rape and murder of her teen daughter, he had no idea the movie would come out in an environment rattled by tales of sexual assault by powerful men. Now, McDormand’s expletive-spewing avenger epitomizes the angry feminist reckoning leading up to its release. “I think it’s a great film to be put out in this climate,” the 47-year-old British-Irish director said over coffee in New York. “But it’s not about just rage and pain. It moves on to a more hopeful, human place.”

See More:‘Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri’: Frances McDormand Asks ‘Why the F–k Not’ In Wild New Video — Watch

The topicality was pure coincidence, but McDonagh will take it. In the weeks following the “Three Billboards” premiere
See full article at Indiewire »

Doc NYC 2017: 13 Films We Can’t Wait to See At the Festival, From ‘EuroTrump’ to ‘David Bowie: The Last Five Years’

  • Indiewire
Doc NYC 2017: 13 Films We Can’t Wait to See At the Festival, From ‘EuroTrump’ to ‘David Bowie: The Last Five Years’
New York City’s annual Doc NYC festival kicks off this week, including a full-to-bursting slate of some of this year’s most remarkable documentaries. If you’ve been looking to beef up on your documentary consumption, Doc NYC is the perfect chance to check out a wide variety of some of the year’s best fact-based features. Ahead, we pick out 14 of our most anticipated films from the fest, including some awards contenders, a handful of buzzy debuts, and a number of festival favorites. Take a look and start filling up your schedule now.

Doc NYC runs November 9 – 16 in New York City.

EuroTrump

Donald Trump may seem like a sui generis figure, a one-of-a-kind monster who was forged in a perfect storm of racism, tweets, and chaos, but history suggests that he’s really just a new breed of an old type. You don’t even have to look
See full article at Indiewire »

Critics Choice Documentary Winners

by Nathaniel R

"Jane," now in theaters, took the top prize at the Critics Choice Documentary Awards

Perhaps if I'm too stay in the Bfca (home to the "Critic's Choice Awards") I should run for actual office within them. Why? Well, change from within. I literally never understand their decisions like awards ceremonies where there are no rules as to how large a category is or isn't. They have this same problem in their main movie awards to a small degree but their documentary competition is even more unruly/nonsensical. These awards, held last night in Brooklyn, had (pause for shuddering) 16 nominees for Best Documentary Feature but 10 nominees for Best Director and only 6 nominees for Debut Documentary and so on and so on. No rhyme or reason! 

But herewith, this year's winners (links go to reviews if we've covered them). All of the feature film winners are on Oscar's long
See full article at FilmExperience »

Jake Gyllenhaal on the Beautiful ‘Absurdity’ of Playing a Real-Life Character Whose Story Was Still Unfolding

Jake Gyllenhaal on the Beautiful ‘Absurdity’ of Playing a Real-Life Character Whose Story Was Still Unfolding
Four years have passed since bombs went off at the finish line of the Boston Marathon that turned then-27-year old Jeff Bauman into a double amputee. In that time, Bauman’s inspiring story – which for many symbolizes Boston’s strength in bouncing back from the tragedy – has been captured in a book, which was then adapted into screenplay and now, the movie “Stronger,” starring Jake Gyllenhaal as Bauman. During that time, Bauman’s recovery – physically, emotionally and mentally – did not happen all at once, nor was it a linear process. In fact, according to Gyllenhaal, Bauman was in a dramatically different headspace at the end of shooting “Stronger” compared to when he saw an early version of the movie.

“In this past year he’s gotten sober, he’s in therapy three times a week and he has conscientiously decided to be a deeply involved father to his daughter,
See full article at Indiewire »

‘One of Us’ Review: Hasidic Jews Survive After Leaving Religious Life in Fascinating Documentary

‘One of Us’ Review: Hasidic Jews Survive After Leaving Religious Life in Fascinating Documentary
There are no talking heads in “One of Us,” Heidi Ewing and Rachel Grady’s expertly crafted portrait of three ex-Hasidic Jews adjusting to secular life. Refreshingly, the interviews in this tense documentary take place on the move; there is a restless energy to the way Luzer drives around Los Angeles in search of auditions, or Etty’s furtive glances through shuttered blinds. The three subjects of “One of Us” are always looking over their shoulders, whether in precaution of real threats or just to make sense of the brave new world in which they find themselves.

Centering on only three subjects, Ewing and Grady keep the film’s focus narrow and intimately human. Luzer is the most charismatic of the bunch; an aspiring actor who got his start playing Hasidic characters, he learned about the secular world as a teenager by secretly watching movies in his car. “The plan
See full article at Indiewire »

Doc Corner: 'One of Us' and 'Thy Father's Chair'

by Glenn Dunks

Not content to let scientology corner the market in controversial religion exposes, directors Heidi Ewing and Rachel Grady focus their attention on New York’s Hasidic community in their latest feature. A dramatic change of pace after last year’s celebrity bio-doc Norman Lear: Just Another Version of You, the filmmakers return at least somewhat to the themes of their most famous film, the Oscar-nominated Jesus Camp. Yet despite the potential cross-over to be found in the pair that seek to uncover the alarming practises of organised religion, One of Us is a much different beast.

Unlike that earlier film, which trained its cameras on the inner-circle of a camp for raising the next generation of evangelicals, One of Us observes from the outside, following the stories of three individuals who have attempted to extract themselves from the community and tell some often haunting and traumatic tales of their times within it.
See full article at FilmExperience »

Leaving the Hasidic Faith: Heidi Ewing and Rachel Grady on One of Us

Described at one point in the film as a community based on survivors of trauma, the Hasidic population of Brooklyn, New York is known for being a tight-knit religious group as private as it is self-dependent. Keeping to the strict customs inherited from their ancestors, the men and women separate themselves from the secular community by adhering to strict dress codes, luddite beliefs and a need to keep their families intact. Equally stringent and oppressive, the Hasidic faith — in the case of Heidi Ewing and Rachel Grady’s new investigative documentary, One of Us, Hasidic New Yorkers — are particularly firm […]
See full article at Filmmaker Magazine »

One of Us Movie Review

  • ShockYa
One of Us Movie Review
One Of Us Netflix Director: Heidi Ewing, Rachel Grady Written by: Heidi Ewing, Rachel Grady Cast: Etty, Ari, Luzer Screened at: Critics’ link, NYC, 9/28/17 Opens: October 20, 2017 streaming It’s good to fit in; in fact for teenagers it’s everything. Look around at young people and you’ll see them tapping away at their iPhones […]

The post One of Us Movie Review appeared first on Shockya.com.
See full article at ShockYa »

Doc NYC Announces Its Awards Short List, Including ‘Icarus,’ ‘Jane,’ and ‘Strong Island’

Doc NYC Announces Its Awards Short List, Including ‘Icarus,’ ‘Jane,’ and ‘Strong Island’
Doc NYC, America’s largest documentary festival, has announced its 15-film Short List of Oscar contenders along with its opening-night selection, “The Final Year,” in which Greg Barker follows key members of Barack Obama’s administration during their last year in office. The festival runs November 9-16.

Thom Powers, Doc NYC’s artistic director as well as documentary programmer for Tiff, oversees curation of the Short List of films that may be in the running for the Academy Award for Best Documentary feature. This year contains a spectrum of funders and distributors, including four from Netflix — and none from HBO.

Historically, most Doc NYC picks do land on the Academy’s official 15-film Oscar Short List. For the past four years, the Short List had nine to 10 titles overlap, with four or five titles going on to Oscar nominations. For the last six years, Doc NYC screened the documentary that
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

Doc NYC Announces Its Awards Short List, Including ‘Icarus,’ ‘Jane,’ and ‘Strong Island’

  • Indiewire
Doc NYC Announces Its Awards Short List, Including ‘Icarus,’ ‘Jane,’ and ‘Strong Island’
Doc NYC, America’s largest documentary festival, has announced its 15-film Short List of Oscar contenders along with its opening-night selection, “The Final Year,” in which Greg Barker follows key members of Barack Obama’s administration during their last year in office. The festival runs November 9-16.

Thom Powers, Doc NYC’s artistic director as well as documentary programmer for Tiff, oversees curation of the Short List of films that may be in the running for the Academy Award for Best Documentary feature. This year contains a spectrum of funders and distributors, including four from Netflix — and none from HBO.

Historically, most Doc NYC picks do land on the Academy’s official 15-film Oscar Short List. For the past four years, the Short List had nine to 10 titles overlap, with four or five titles going on to Oscar nominations. For the last six years, Doc NYC screened the documentary that
See full article at Indiewire »

See also

Showtimes | External Sites