Frontline (1983– )
8.2/10
116
1 user 1 critic

Losing Iraq 

From PBS and FRONTLINE: FRONTLINE examines the unfolding chaos in Iraq and how the U.S. is being pulled back into the conflict. Drawing on interviews with policymakers and military leaders,... See full summary »

Director:

Reviews

Watch Now

From $1.99 (SD) on Amazon Video

1 nomination. See more awards »

Photos

Add Image Add an image

Do you have any images for this title?

Edit

Cast

Episode cast overview, first billed only:
...
Himself - Narrator (voice)
Peter Baker ...
Himself - Author, Days of Fire
Thomas Ricks ...
Himself - Author, Fiasco
...
Himself - President (archive footage)
...
Himself - President (archive footage)
Douglas Ollivant ...
Himself - Iraq Director, NSC
Ryan Crocker ...
Himself - U.S. Ambassador to Iraq
Stephen Hadley ...
Himself - Bush National Security Advisor
Brian McCoy ...
Himself - Colonel, USMC
Rajiv Chandrasekaran ...
Himself - Author, Imperial Life in the Emerald City
Barbara Bodine ...
Herself - Office of Reconstruction and Humanitarian Assistance
Steve Casteel ...
Himself - Advisor to Interior Ministry
R. Alan King ...
Himself - Colonel, U.S. Army
John Burns ...
Himself - Reporter, The New York Times
Anthony H. Cordesman ...
Himself - Center for Strategic and International Studies
Edit

Storyline

From PBS and FRONTLINE: FRONTLINE examines the unfolding chaos in Iraq and how the U.S. is being pulled back into the conflict. Drawing on interviews with policymakers and military leaders, the film traces the U.S. role from the 2003 invasion to the current violence, showing how Iraq itself is coming undone, how we got here, what went wrong, and what happens next. Written by Anonymous

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Genres:

Documentary

Certificate:

TV-PG | See all certifications »
Edit

Details

Language:

Release Date:

29 July 2014 (USA)  »

Company Credits

Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Color:

Aspect Ratio:

16:9 HD
See  »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.

User Reviews

Malikki, the monster of Baghdad
16 October 2016 | by (The San Francisco Bay Area) – See all my reviews

That title (or something like it) went to Malikki's predecessor; Saddam Hussein. This Frontline episode looks at the political, social and military forces and events that lead to the buildup and explosion of ISIS on Northern Iraq.

The program interviews top military and civil leaders who were involved in the Iraq reconstruction effort after our invasion there. It looks at the various phases of violence and what could be characterized as Hussein backed "resistance fighters" to our forces within Iraq.

It is long, and unlike its successor, "Confronting ISIS", is far better researched. We don't hear interviews with Bush, Obama, Cheyney, Rice, et al, but we do hear from the people they appointed to administer Iraq during Operation Iraqi Freedom.

There is an examination of the "Light Footprint" theory of dealing with Iraq, and where the documentary, like nearly all of Frontline's well researched and presented pieces, doesn't take a position on said theory, it does show the ramifications of it, and shows how those leading the Iraq effort felt the need for a reinforcement (strangely labeled "a surge" ... who comes up with these labels? How come "reinforcement(s)" wasn't good enough? Oh well...).

But in this two hour long piece, toward the last third or rather fourth of the documentary, we come to the Malikki factor. And the films shows and presents this man's efforts to undermine everything our armed forces and civilian administration had spent years in building after toppling Saddam Hussein.

The middle east, in my opinion, is still a medieval society. You have opportunists everywhere. And where we in the United States and in Europe and elsewhere have mechanisms of dealing with such people, it's clear the Middle East does not. From sociopaths to petty yet sophisticated crime syndicates, we know how to deal with them. The middle east, and Iraq in this case, does not. Ergo these people get into the power structure and destroy all of our hard work so as to make the blood and treasure we spent all for nothing.

Highly informative.


0 of 0 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you?

Contribute to This Page