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Look & See: A Portrait of Wendell Berry (2016)

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2:31 | Trailer
A portrait of the world as lensed through the works of farmer, writer and activist Wendell Berry.

Directors:

, (co-director)
3 wins & 3 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Credited cast:
John Berry Jr. ...
Himself (voice)
Mary Berry ...
Tanya Berry ...
Herself
Wendell Berry ...
Himself (voice)
John Logan Brent ...
Himself - Henry County Judge
Earl L. Butz ...
Himself - Former Secretary of Agriculture (archive footage)
Curtis Combs ...
Himself
Arwen Donahue ...
Herself
Michael Douglas ...
Himself
Juan Javier Reyes ...
Himself
Dale Roberts ...
Himself
Mark Roberts ...
Himself
Steve Smith ...
Phoebe Wagoner ...
Herself
Andy Zaring ...
Himself
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Storyline

A portrait of the world as lensed through the works of farmer, writer and activist Wendell Berry.

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Genres:

Documentary

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Details

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Release Date:

11 March 2016 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Forty Panes  »

Filming Locations:

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Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Color:

(HD)
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Audio from a now historic debate at Manchester College, Indiana between between Earl Butz (Former US Secretary of Agriculture) and Wendell Berry was discovered and restored for use in this film. See more »

Quotes

Wendell Berry: We all come from divorce, now. This is an age of divorce. Things that belong together have been taken apart, and you can't put it all back together again. What you do is the only thing that you can do: you take two things that ought to be together and you put them back together. Two things, not all things. That's the way the work has to go.
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User Reviews

 
A Seer: The Eloquent Voice of the Poet of Agrarian Life
13 March 2016 | by See all my reviews

A Seer was well-received in its World Premiere at the SXSW Film Festival in Austin, TX. It is an appropriate sequel to Dunn's excellent film Unforeseen about economic development in Austin. The film combines a biographical component of the career, poetry and writings of Kentucky farmer Wendell Berry with an explanation of Berry's political ideas. The film critiques the way in which the small family farm agriculture of a few generations has been pushed aside by modern-industrial mechanized agriculture. The number of farms has decreased and the size of the remaining farms has increased. The percentage of the population working the land has plummeted. The film is an ode to a world that has been lost. It is eloquent, reverential and beautifully filmed. It seems to romanticize the agrarian past without putting it under a critical lens. The film moves slowly and often repetitively. It is ultimately somewhat unfulfilling, because in its eloquence it offers few solutions for the inevitable changes brought on by modernity. It seems to want to encourage farmers to engage in organic farming and encourage local consumption, but it doesn't seem to offer any real pathway for getting to that end. Its meandering style is also somewhat frustrating since it has few real answers. It just seems to be backwards looking. Still, it is beautifully filmed and those that are sympathetic to its agenda will find it enjoyable if they are patient with it.


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