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17 times movies and TV shows were refused rights to songs

Louisa Mellor Jul 1, 2016

Not every artist is happy to have their song featured in a particular TV show or film. Here are 17 times the rights were refused...

It's not only political campaigns that inspire musical artists to exercise the power of veto on the use of their songs. For reasons of finance, reputation, ego, taste and more, the following TV shows and films weren't able to secure the use of the recordings they originally sought...

Frank SinatraGoodfellas

This Express piece quotes an Empire Magazine interview with Martin Scorsese’s long-time editor Thelma Schoonmaker in which she relates how the original plan was to have Frank Sinatra’s original recording of My Way play over the end credits of modern gangster classic Goodfellas instead of the Sid Vicious cover that was eventually used.

Sinatra would never let Marty use his music,” explains Schoonmaker, “which is too bad because Marty may
See full article at Den of Geek »

What Does a Woman Pothead Look Like?

What Does a Woman Pothead Look Like?
Don't get Jane West started on Seth Rogen. West – the co-founder of Women Grow, a professional network for female cannabis entrepreneurs – is no fan of the monopoly that stoner bros seem to have on pop culture. You know the type: Cheech and Chong, The Dude, the guys from Friday and Mall Rats and Half Baked, and, of course, Rogen, the current cinematic standard-bearer of the bong-hitting, heavy-lidded, very male tribe. "Seth Rogen makes millions of dollars propagating the entire image of what a stoner is," West says. The problem with
See full article at Rolling Stone »

'Endless Love', 'Gambit' and Criterion Delivers 'Life Aquatic' This Week on DVD and Blu-ray

Before we get to the new releases, I wanted to remind you Amazon has all of Wes Anderson's films on sale this week, which means all the following Blu-rays, click on any of the titles for purchasing information: Bottle Rocket ($19.49) my review Rushmore ($19.99) The Royal Tenenbaums ($18.99) The Darjeeling Limited ($20.99) my review Fantastic Mr. Fox ($20.99) And with that we get to... The Life Aquatic with Steve Zissou (Criterion Collection) The initial DVD release of Wes Anderson's The Life Aquatic with Steve Zissou was a collaboration between Criterion and Buena Vista Home Entertainment, but now it's getting an official Blu-ray and DVD release from Criterion with a new 4K transfer and a bounty of additional features: New, restored 4K digital film transfer, approved by director Wes Anderson, with 5.1 surround DTS-hd Master Audio soundtrack on the Blu-ray edition Audio commentary by Anderson and cowriter Noah Baumbach This Is an Adventure, a
See full article at Rope Of Silicon »

John Fortune obituary

Comedian and actor best known for the satirical television show Bremner, Bird and Fortune

John Fortune, who has died aged 74 after a long illness, was a distinguished member of the Oxbridge generation of brainy comedians who turned British entertainment inside out in the early 1960s, along with his friend, college contemporary and writing partner, John Bird, as well as Peter Cook, Jonathan Miller, Alan Bennett, David Frost, Eleanor Bron and John Wells.

From his earliest days on Ned Sherrin's Not So Much a Programme, More a Way of Life, the successor in 1964-65 to the satirical television magazine That Was the Week That Was, through to the comedy shows with Rory Bremner in the 1990s and beyond, he was a fixture of barely surprised indifference, with a wonderful line in deflationary, logical understatement. Tall and gangly, with a warm and ready smile but a performance default mode of aghast,
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

John Fortune obituary

Comedian and actor best known for the satirical television show Bremner, Bird and Fortune

John Fortune, who has died aged 74 after a long illness, was a distinguished member of the Oxbridge generation of brainy comedians who turned British entertainment inside out in the early 1960s, along with his friend, college contemporary and writing partner, John Bird, as well as Peter Cook, Jonathan Miller, Alan Bennett, David Frost, Eleanor Bron and John Wells.

From his earliest days on Ned Sherrin's Not So Much a Programme, More a Way of Life, the successor in 1964-65 to the satirical television magazine That Was the Week That Was, through to the comedy shows with Rory Bremner in the 1990s and beyond, he was a fixture of barely surprised indifference, with a wonderful line in deflationary, logical understatement. Tall and gangly, with a warm and ready smile but a performance default mode of aghast,
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Comedian John Fortune dies, aged 74

John Fortune has died at the age of 74.

The comedian - who found fame through his TV collaborations with John Bird and Rory Bremner - died peacefully with his wife by his side earlier today (December 31).

Fortune's agent Vivienne Clore said: "It is with great sadness that I write of the death of John Fortune this morning aged 74.

"He died peacefully with his wife, Emma and dog Grizelle, at his bedside.

"A renowned satirist, early work included contributions to Peter Cook's Establishment club and more latterly his work with long-term collaborator John Bird and Rory Bremner.

"He is survived by his adored wife, Emma and three children."

Rory Bremner paid tribute to the star on Twitter, saying: "I'm so sorry to let you know that my friend John Fortune died this morning. Lovely man, dear friend, brilliant & fearless satirist."

Fortune met Bird while studying at King's College, Cambridge and
See full article at Digital Spy - TV news »

'Made in Dagenham's Nigel Cole directing 'Daylight Robbery'

'Made in Dagenham's Nigel Cole directing 'Daylight Robbery'
Nigel Cole has signed on to direct Daylight Robbery.

The Made in Dagenham director will tackle Exclusive Media's action comedy, according to The Hollywood Reporter.

The film will centre around a group of feisty retirees struggling to help a friend on the brink of losing their home.

They hatch a plan to rob the bank that refused to give her financial aid.

Cole will reunite with his Calendar Girls writer Tim Firth on the project.

The director's other films include Saving Grace and A Lot Like Love. Firth's writing credits include Confessions of a Shopaholic, Blackball and Kinky Boots.

Daylight Robbery is currently casting and will shoot in 2014.
See full article at Digital Spy - Movie News »

Nigel Cole to Helm ‘Daylight Robbery’

Nigel Cole to Helm ‘Daylight Robbery’
London — U.K. helmer Nigel Cole and scripter Tim Firth — the team behind “Calendar Girls” — will reunite for action comedy “Daylight Robbery.”

Pic centers on a group of feisty retirees struck by the pension crisis, who hatch a plan to steal millions after the bank refuses to help their friend, leaving her on the brink of losing her home.

The pic will be produced by Exclusive Media in association with James Gay-Rees of Playmaker Films, who produced “The Quiet Ones,” which will be released by Lionsgate in the U.S. next year. Exclusive Media is fully financing the film.

Cole’s credits include the Golden Globe nominated “Saving Grace,” starring Brenda Blethyn and Martin Clunes, which won the Sundance Film Festival audience award; the BAFTA nommed “Made in Dagenham,” starring Bob Hoskins and Sally Hawkins; and the romantic comedy “A Lot Like Love,” starring Amanda Peet and Ashton Kutcher.

Firth
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Nigel Cole to Direct Daylight Robbery

The Calendar Girls' team of Nigel Cole and Tim Firth are set to reunite for the Daylight Robbery action comedy which Cole will direct, reports Variety. The film tells of a group of retired folks who are hit by the pension crisis and come up with a scheme to steal millions from a bank after the financial institution refuses to help their friend, who hangs on the edge of losing her home. Exclusive Media fully finances, and also produces Daylight Robbery in association with Playmaker Films' James Gay-Rees (The Quiet Ones). Other than Calendar Girls, Cole's credits include A Lot Like Love, Saving Grace, TV's Into the Wild and Peak Practice.
See full article at Upcoming-Movies.com »

Cole to direct Daylight Robbery

  • ScreenDaily
Cole to direct Daylight Robbery
Exclusive: Exclusive Media producing with James Gay-Rees; marks start of Exclusive’s new focus on UK non-genre productions.

Calendar Girls director Nigel Cole and writer Tim Firth are reuniting on new action comedy Daylight Robbery, about a group of British retirees planning a bank heist.

Exclusive Media is producing in association with James Gay-Rees of Playmaker Films, who also worked with Exclusive’s Hammer Films on The Quiet Ones.

This film marks Exclusive’s growing focus of producing non-genre films in the UK. Exclusive’s production outfit Hammer will continue to focus on genre films, including the forthcoming shoot for The Woman In Black: Angel of Death.

Exclusive is fully financing Daylight Robbery.

The story is about a group of feisty pensioners who are hit by the financial crisis and plan to rob a bank to save one friend who is on the verge of losing her home.

Susie Figgis is serving as casting director and is
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Nigel Cole to direct Daylight Robbery

  • ScreenDaily
Nigel Cole to direct Daylight Robbery
Exclusive: Exclusive Media producing with James Gay-Rees; marks start of Exclusive’s new focus on UK non-genre productions.

Calendar Girls director Nigel Cole and writer Tim Firth are reuniting on new action comedy Daylight Robbery, about a group of British retirees planning a bank heist.

Exclusive Media is producing in association with James Gay-Rees of Playmaker Films, who also worked with Exclusive’s Hammer Films on The Quiet Ones.

This film marks Exclusive’s growing focus of producing non-genre films in the UK. Exclusive’s production outfit Hammer will continue to focus on genre films, including the forthcoming shoot for The Woman In Black: Angel of Death.

Exclusive is fully financing Daylight Robbery.

The story is about a group of feisty pensioners who are hit by the financial crisis and plan to rob a bank to save one friend who is on the verge of losing her home.

Susie Figgis is serving as casting director and is
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Pioneering TNT Ignites Mainstream Love

From the start, from its very name, TNT was designed to make a statement.

Sure, the Turner Broadcasting empire at the time included TBS, but that channel had evolved from its roots as an Atlanta Uhf TV station that bulked up through the steroidal effect of “Superstation” satellite distribution to content-hungry cable operators. TNT, on the other hand, was the vision that Ted Turner — oracle of cable TV programmers — had for a new outlet that would compete head to head against the major broadcasters with original programming, sports and event fare.

An acronym epitomizing something explosive was only the beginning.

“I wanted it to be a major player and go after the highest-profile things you could have in TV — the Academy Awards and so forth,” Turner told Variety as he reflected on the 25th anniversary of TNT’s launch on Oct. 3, 1988. “We found a hell of a good name and we were off and running.
See full article at Variety - TV News »

Will Cecily Strong Be SNL's Saving Grace This Season?

Alright, safe to say the SNL buzz surrounding Cecily Strong is getting louder and louder, and a recent NY Post article focused on the hilarious female sure didn't hurt at all. Cecily Strong, first of all, sounds like the name for a cartoon character or a kid's book, and that only works in her comedic […]

Will Cecily Strong Be SNL's Saving Grace This Season?
See full article at TVovermind.com »

Mad Max's Weekend Movie Guide: '2 Guns' & More

"The chain in those handcuffs is high-tensile steel. It'd take you ten minutes to hack through it with this. Now, if you're lucky, you could hack through your ankle in five minutes. Go." — Mel Gibson, 'Mad Max'

Greetings from the apocalypse! Hopefully this isn't the end, but I have to depart the sandblasted pages of this column for a brief sojourn across the wasteland. With a little luck, a lot of gasoline and the aid of a gangly autogyro pilot I should find my way back in a few months time, but until then enjoy this last weekend column … for now.

Friday, August 2

Pow! In Theaters

As I wrote earlier this week for Film.com, "2 Guns" will without a doubt take its place among the pantheon of extremely forgettable Denzel Washington action movies. Hell, the trailer could have been one of those parodies from the beginning of "Tropic Thunder.
See full article at NextMovie »

Nigel Cole takes on Fisherman's Friends

Director of Calendar Girls and Made in Dagenham will bring the story of Port Isaac shanty singers to cinemas

The story of Cornish sea shanty group the Fisherman's Friends is to be made into a film. The good news will be welcomed by supporters of the band still mourning the death of singer Trevor Grills and tour manager Paul McMullen, who died in an accident at the G Live theatre venue in Guildford earlier this year.

Reading on mobile? Watch the band's video here

The film, to be directed by Nigel Cole, will chart a journey that started in a pub in Port Isaac and led to the Sunday morning slot on the main stage of Glastonbury festival in 2011. The 10-strong group of fishermen, coastguards and lifeboatmen gained a boost after DJ Johnnie Walker heard them play while on holiday in the Cornish village. A £1m record deal soon followed.
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Will You Be Having "Labor Day" For Christmas?

Labor Day, the latest film from writer/director Jason Reitman is now scheduled to open on Christmas Day so I thought I'd post about it on Independence Day just to continue its holiday confusions!

You may remember that I had promised to read two books that y'all voted on in that "read this before the movie comes out" and this was your second choice pick (I'll read 12 Years a Slave next). I managed to get through thise runner up on flights during my recent Scandinavian trip. Joyce Manard's "Labor Day" was an easy read, actually as the novel is slim and the story is condensed to a very short time frame. I like both of its book covers though they're vague (love and peach pies do figure in but...) and its difficult to say what they're selling but the same is arguably true of the book, which I felt ambivalent
See full article at FilmExperience »

Cougar Town Review: A Stern Talking To

  • TVfanatic
Like a good bottle of wine, when Cougar Town is telling great jokes one after another, there’s really nothing better.

Therefore, there was Really nothing better than "Saving Grace," as Grayson found religion, Jules found a seagull and Ellie coined the cracker pocket.

Grayson not believing in a higher power, or Laurie’s a little bit of everything, fits him perfectly - and it’s rather hilarious how he's using all that time during Jules’ lengthy grace sessions: to get some alone time.

While Grayson doesn’t need to worship or believe in anything, Jules is correct in pointing out that he should support, not mock, whatever she believes in (even if it might be Mr. Beakington’s alter at this point). Cougar Town never touches upon religion, but it’s a nice note to pick up from after learning more of Chick’s ailing health battles. It’s
See full article at TVfanatic »

Cougar Town Ep 4.11 ‘Saving Grace’ struggles to find balance

Cougar Town Season 4, Episode 11 ‘Saving Grace

Directed by Michael McDonald

Written by Blake McCormick

Airs Tuesday nights at 10pm (Et) on TBS

There have been a few episodes this season where Cougar Town‘s reached a bit to create marital drama between the two couples at the heart of the show (although the same would apply to Laurie and Travis at times, as well). ‘Saving Grace’ is definitely one of those episodes, presenting us with a number of story lines and rushing through them for mostly unsatisfying conclusions. When Cougar Town dips into the sappy well it can be hit or miss, as the last few scenes of the episode show.

Things begin in kind of an odd place: Grayson and Jules have a disagreement over faith, a topic I’d rather most comedies just avoided. Both to its benefit and its disadvantage, ‘Saving Grace’ doesn’t really dig into this idea too far.
See full article at SoundOnSight »

Berlin Diary Part I

This Berlin flew by! A good overview is that of Screen Daily and if we're lucky, you can read it here without subscribing. My own activities flowed from two sources:

1) Education: I taught and led tours of the market for Berlinale's Talent Campus Meet the Experts, for Deutsche Welle Akademie Film Festival Workshop, and for Ina Sup, a TV, film and new media school based in France and linked to the French National Audiovisual Institute (Ina). This is the most rewarding work, seeing what talent is coming up in our world, seeing ideas take hold as the students learn about the market.

2) Our Consulting: Another pillar of our company, aside from blogging and professional education, is strategic planning with filmmakers. This Berlinale was very intense and very energizing for my partner Peter Belsito and me, with Beyond the Moonwalk having found a berth for international sales representation with Steve Arroyave's Arrow Entertainment and a U.S. distribution commitment, and more actively involving, with Donna Deitch's The Catcher, where a series of meetings with top German and Canadian producers and sales agents gave the project the momentum of a race horse bound for first place!

What follows are my impressions of various other Berlin events as they passed by -- ever so quickly -- but still with enough eye-catching power to capture my attention in the first place.

I was happy to see Jeff Lipsky and Adopt Films' co-managing executive Tim Grady cleaning up with 3 acquisitions; no time to waste anymore as the third Bingham Ray memorial pointed out to those who have the mind to realize the message. Sister (L'enfant d'en haut) by Ursula Maier (Isa: Memento, Swiss rights with FilmCoopi), I hear is A+, Paolo and Vittorio Taviani's Caesar Must Die (Cesare deve morire) (Isa: Rai Trade) won the Golden Bear, and Chris Petzold's Barbara, all in Competition.

American indie works-in-progress have been granted a second chance to screen for European indie distributors (EuropaDistribution) at the upcoming Paris Film Festival in June. I have been invited to be on the jury of "U.S. in Progress" and am thrilled at the prospect. I was honored to have been invited to be on the jury in Wroclaw at the American Film Festival in November as well, for the first edition of this chance for U.S. filmmakers to win post-production and cash prizes. This is where the film Now, Forager was picked up by fledgling international sales agent, the only international sales agent in Poland, New Europe Sales founded by Jan Naszewski [jnaszewski At gmail.com] and Anja Sosic [anja At NewEuropeFilmSales.com]. The film went on to screen at Rotterdam Film Festival. Even hotter news will be forthcoming from Moma and The New York Film Society's New Directors/ New Films about one of the films at the Aff's "U.S. in Progress". If you missed it in Poland you will be able to see it in New York this April!

I was lucky to see two films during the market and after the market closed, this last Saturday and Sunday, when I caught some more films I was unable to see earlier due to my "real" work. Of the films I saw here in Berlin, here are my unique :) comments for what they're worth.

Children of Srikandi (Panorama) is a very personal account by a female filmmaker collective in Indonesia on what it means to be a lesbian in their society. The sweet intimacy of the film overrides its non-professional veneer (the "filmmakers" were all non-professionals). In fact, this could serve as a template for other non-professionals who want to tell their stories. Schools come to mind as possible candidates for this sort of filmmaking, as does my own pet project, The Literacy Project. The Indonesian contingent here in Berlin was interesting and sociable as they met their audience and fans. They were hosted by Berlin based producers Laura Coppens who is a doctorate student in ethnological studies in Zurich and Angelika Levi, doc filmmaker (My Life, Part 2 about growing up Jewish in Berlin).

Bergman & Magnani: The War of the Volcanos. This invitation-only work in progress with Wide House uses a unique way to show the emotion filled and the biggest jet-set love scandal of all times, the story of Roberto Rossellini, Anna Magnani and Ingrid Bergman as Rosellini and the volcanic Anna Magnani ended their relationship after making Volcano (1950) and the married Ingrid Bergman and Rossellini began theirs with the filming of Stromboli (1950), the name of the second volcano on this Aeolian Island which has been in almost continuous eruption for 2,000 years. The visuals of their stories are illustrated entirely with the scenes from movies starring them as they enact the real life emotions and the commentary of the doc. I am most interested to see how well this technique succeeds.

Paolo and Vittorio Taviani's Caesar Must Die (Isa: Rai Trade) is a moving illustration of the transformative power of art as hardened criminals in an Italian prison rehearse and perform Shakespeare's Julius Caesar. The the 80 + year old Brothers Taviani deserve recognition for their artistic excellence. I can't argue with Mike Leigh and the jury's judgement except that on my emotional meter, Rebelle (War Witch) was the real winner.

Rebelle (War Witch) by Kim Nguyen (Isa: Films Distribution) should have won the Golden Bear. The Silver Bear for Best Actress was awarded to Rachel Mwanza, but this film is so deeply moving on the most primal levels, maintaining its African roots while touching our most sensitive emotions of parents, love, rape, pregnancy and infants as they are experienced by a female child soldier from ages 12 to 14. It should also win Best Foreign Language Film in next year's Academy Awards. Produced by the industry vets Marie-Claude Poulin and Pierre Even, it is yet another feather in the cap of the the Canadian film industry.

Dieter Kosslick observed that with 15 Competition titles confirmed at the time Screen International interviewed him, “both thematically and geographically, we have many films coming this year from Asia, and particularly China and Indonesia. There is also an interesting focus on France this year, beginning with the opening film Farewell My Queen (Les adieux a la reine) (Isa: Elle Driver) and going through all of the festival’s sections. Moreover, we have two French jury members [Francois Ozon and Charlotte Gainsbourg] in the International Jury.“ Eight titles selected to date have German majority or minority participation, so German filmmakers and (co-)producers will again enjoy a record presence in the Competition on a par with 2011’s tally of eight films involving German directors or German production partners." He also notes Competition films' trending toward "times of upheaval and new departures... with many films coming from Africa and Arab countries". My observation of the 23 Competition films finally selected is that the nostalgic look back at European aristocracy and top social tiers (A Royal Affair, Bel Ami, Farewell My Queen) and its mores stands in stark contrast to today's upheavals of families and children (Childish Games, Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close, Postcards from the Zoo, Just the Wind, Mercy, Shadow Dancer, Sister, Rebelle, Home for the Weekend, Jayne Mansfield's Car, Coming Home). Seven other films continue the theme of social upheavals: Tey - which deal with childhood memories of Senegal experienced by an American, Captive about Phillipine hostages, Barbara an Eastern German looking to move to the West, Caesar Must Die about prisoners finding art in their sequestered lives, Flying Swords of Dragon Gate about upheavel during the Ming Dynasty, White Deer Plain about upheavel towards the end of Imperial China, The Flowers of War about the upheavel of China by the Japanese in World War II. The exceptions, Tabu and Meteora, deal with love, the Saving Grace.

Two major disappointments were Steven Soderberg's Haywire (Isa: Mandate) and Stephen Elliott's Cherry. Both about women, they left me puzzled with what the plot was about. Pretty, well done and negligible.

This Berlin Diary Part 2 will continue after I work on my new and soon-to-be launched website! I have spent an entire day on this blog and I still have much more to write!
See full article at Sydney's Buzz »

Brosnan Will Be Last Man Out

Brosnan Will Be Last Man Out
“Written by Craig Ferguson.” There’s a credit you don’t see so often these days, though he has crafted scripts before, working on the likes of The Big Tease and Saving Grace. But while he’s largely penned comedy in the past, Ferguson has switched tracks into thriller territory for Last Man Out, which has Pierce Brosnan attached to star.Adapted by Ferguson and Ted Mulkerin from Stuart Neville’s revenge-thriller tome The Twelve, Last Man Out follows a former Ira hit man who is released from prison after 20 years.Haunted by his crime and the memory of the people he killed, he decides he can find no peace until he brings down vengeance on the people who ordered those murders on behalf of the victims. What is it with assassins growing consciences these days?Terry Loan is cranking the cameras, although while the project is being sold at Berlin’s film market,
See full article at EmpireOnline »
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