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DGA Documentary Awards Nominations Snubs and Surprises: Oscar Frontrunners ‘Jane’ and ‘Faces Places’ Don’t Make Cut

As usual the documentary awards race is all over the place. DGA nominations are either a sign of strength or a boost into a must-see before the Oscar balloting closes on Friday. The DGA combines hybrid long-form documentaries along with features, such as AFI special award-winner “The Vietnam War” from Ken Burns ands Lynn Novick, and Errol Morris’s groundbreaking Netflix series “Wormwood,” which was not deemed eligible for the documentary Oscar, to the filmmaker’s chagrin.

Given filmmaker Bryan Fogel’s role in unveiling the high-profile Russian Olympic doping scandal, Netflix’s Oscar short-listed “Icarus” continues to move forward, while Matt Heineman’s “City of Ghosts” pulls ahead of other Syria documentaries. Two significant omissions here are Brett Morgen for Jane Goodall profile “Jane” and Agnes Varda and J.R.’s whimsical visual tour-de-force “Faces Places,” which are considered Oscar frontrunners.

Netflix and PBS scored two DGA slots each,
See full article at Indiewire »

DGA Documentary Awards Nominations Snubs and Surprises: Oscar Frontrunners ‘Jane’ and ‘Faces Places’ Don’t Make Cut

As usual the documentary awards race is all over the place. DGA nominations are either a sign of strength or a boost into a must-see before the Oscar balloting closes on Friday. The DGA combines hybrid long-form documentaries along with features, such as AFI special award-winner “The Vietnam War” from Ken Burns ands Lynn Novick, and Errol Morris’s groundbreaking Netflix series “Wormwood,” which was not deemed eligible for the documentary Oscar, to the filmmaker’s chagrin.

Given filmmaker Bryan Fogel’s role in unveiling the high-profile Russian Olympic doping scandal, Netflix’s Oscar short-listed “Icarus” continues to move forward, while Matt Heineman’s “City of Ghosts” pulls ahead of other Syria documentaries. Two significant omissions here are Brett Morgen for Jane Goodall profile “Jane” and Agnes Varda and J.R.’s whimsical visual tour-de-force “Faces Places,” which are considered Oscar frontrunners.

Netflix and PBS scored two DGA slots each,
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

The 'Honorable’ Omarosa Manigault: All the Drama from Her Extended 15 Minutes of Fame in the White House

The 'Honorable’ Omarosa Manigault: All the Drama from Her Extended 15 Minutes of Fame in the White House
It isn’t her first fall from grace involving Donald Trump but it might be the biggest. This week, the White House announced the resignation of reality-tv-star-turned-political-aide Omarosa Manigault Newman — while insiders countered that she was escorted off the White House grounds in a dramatic ousting.

Manigault Newman, who was fired by Trump three times on various seasons of The Apprentice, has rebutted reports that she faced the same fate in her White House position. But there’s no denying her downfall. Here’s a look back at the low points leading up to her White House departure.

Banished from
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

The Real Reason Omarosa Is Leaving the White House

  • Yidio
2017-12-13T10:45:22-08:00The Real Reason Omarosa Is Leaving the White House

She might have been good at back-stabbing her way through reality-tv challenges on The Apprentice, but when it came to being a useful part of the Executive Branch of government, Omarosa Manigault's skill set seems to have come up short. After a series of gaffes and job transfers, Omarosa will be leaving the White house to "pursue opportunities," although the main opportunity she's probably pursuing is the opportunity to be the latest White House staffer fired by Donald Trump.

Via Us Weekly.

Omarosa Manigault is leaving the White House. After joining Donald Trump’s staff as part of his transition team in 2016, the White House announced on Wednesday, December 13, that the former Apprentice contestant will be departing in early 2018.

Omarosa Manigault Newman resigned yesterday to pursue other opportunities,” Press Secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders said in a statement.
See full article at Yidio »

Shortlist for Oscars® Nominated Docu Features

Shortlist for Oscars® Nominated Docu Features
The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences today announced that 15 films in the Documentary Feature category will advance in the voting process for the 90th Academy Awards®. One hundred seventy films were originally submitted in the category.

The 15 films are listed below in alphabetical order by title, with their production companies:

Abacus: Small Enough to Jail, Mitten Media, Motto Pictures, Kartemquin Educational Films and Wgbh/Frontline.

Director Steve James

A small financial institution called Abacus becomes the only company criminally indicted in the wake of the United States’ 2008 mortgage crisis.

Chasing Coral, Exposure Labs in partnership with The Ocean Agency & View Into the Blue in association with Argent Pictures & The Kendeda Fund. Directed by Jeff Orlowski

Coral reefs around the world are vanishing at an unprecedented rate. A team of divers, photographers and scientists set out on a thrilling ocean adventure to discover why and to reveal the underwater mystery to the world.
See full article at Sydney's Buzz »

Writers Guild of America 2018 TV Nominations: ‘Stranger Things,’ ‘Godless,’ and ‘Big Little Lies’

Writers Guild of America 2018 TV Nominations: ‘Stranger Things,’ ‘Godless,’ and ‘Big Little Lies’
The Writers Guild of America, East (WGAE) and the Writers Guild of America, West (WGAW) have announced nominations for this year’s television categories, including Drama Series, Comedy Series, and Long Form Original. Reigning Emmy winners “The Handmaid’s Tale” and “Veep” are nominated in their respective categories, as is HBO’s acclaimed “Big Little Lies” limited series.

Winners will be honored at the 2018 Writers Guild Awards on Sunday, February 11, 2018. Ceremonies will take place in New York City and Los Angeles. The full list of 2018 nominations are below.

Drama Series

The Americans

Better Call Saul

“The Handmaid’s Tale”

Stranger Things

Comedy Series

Curb Your Enthusiasm

“Glow”

Master of None

Silicon Valley

Veep

Long Form Original

American Horror Story: Cult

Feud: Bette and Joan

“Flint”

Godless

Manhunt: Unabomber

Long Form Adapted

Big Little Lies

“Fargo
See full article at Indiewire »

Steve James Says ‘Abacus: Small Enough to Jail’ Was a Purposefully Intimate Look at the 2008 Financial Crisis

In the 2008 financial crisis, there was only one bank that was ever indicted on charges related to mortgage fraud — not one of the big Wall Street banks, but instead a small, family-owned, neighborhood institution serving the immigrant community of New York City’s Chinatown: Abacus Federal Savings Bank.

The film “Abacus: Small Enough to Jail,” follows the Sung family as they defend their business from prosecution.

At a Q&A following a screening of the film at the International Documentary Association’s annual screening series, producer Mark Mitten, who had known the Sung family for years, said their story flew under the radar.

Read More:‘City of Ghosts’ Director Matthew Heineman Explains How to Fight Isis Without Bombs

“Even they didn’t recognize that they were the only bank that was indicted for mortgage fraud. So I started to dig into it to say, ‘There’s got to be another bank.
See full article at Indiewire »

Doc NYC 2017 Women Directors: Meet Rachel Dretzin — “Far From the Tree”

“Far From the Tree”

Rachel Dretzin has been honored with numerous awards for her documentaries, including the Emmy Award, the Peabody, the Du-Pont Columbia, and the Robert F. Kennedy Journalism Award. For many years she has directed and produced documentaries for PBS’ “Frontline,” with credits including “The Lost Children of Rockdale County,” “A Hidden Life,” and “Failure to Protect.” Dretzin is co-founder of Ark Media, a Brooklyn-based production company and a leading producer of nonfiction content.

“Far From the Tree” will premiere at the 2017 Doc NYC film festival on November 10.

W&H: Describe the film for us in your own words.

Rd: “Far From the Tree” is a film about how we respond to the stranger among us — especially when that stranger is our own child. How do you bridge a connection to someone profoundly different when they are in your own family? To me, this film is about the beauty of difference at a time when we are watching a daily, jarring assault on the “other,” an experience which, in my opinion, has coarsened our country and unsettled all of us.

W&H: What drew you to this story?

Rd: Andrew Solomon’s book “Far From the Tree: Parents, Children, and the Search for Identity,” which is passionately humanistic and full of stories that seize the heart. When I read it, all I could think was “this has to be a movie!” It turned out I wasn’t the only filmmaker who was entertaining that idea — but ultimately, I was lucky enough to obtain the rights to make the film.

W&H: What do you want people to think about when they are leaving the theater?

Rd: I want people to feel their hearts open a little bit. After I first read Solomon’s book, I walked out on the street and realized no one looked the same to me. My assumptions about people who look and act “different” had been shaken to their roots. People tell me they have a similar experience after seeing the film and I take that as a profound compliment.

W&H: What was the biggest challenge in making the film?

Rd: It’s a multiple character film with stories that don’t connect narratively, which made it really tough to cut. Plus we had to integrate the writer of the book, whose personal narrative and perspective is woven throughout. So the edit was a little bit of a beast. Finding a way to make the whole thing feel organic took a ton of time and a lot of trial and error.

W&H: How did you get your film funded?

Rd: Participant Media came in early. Diane Weyermann, who runs docs at Participant, had read the book and had a similar reaction to mine — she was totally moved by it. Participant offered me a development deal that allowed me to cast and develop the movie. From there it was a pretty straight path to funding: Participant came in for half and a private funder for the other half. I consider myself very lucky.

W&H: What does it mean for you to have your film play at Doc NYC?

Rd: I’ve long been a fan of the festival and I go every year. New York City is where I was born and where I’ve always lived, and playing the film here allows me to celebrate with my friends, family, and colleagues. Being chosen as the centerpiece film and playing in a big theatre like the School of Visual Arts Theatre is a dream come true.

W&H: What’s the best and worst advice you’ve received?

Rd: The worst advice I’ve received is to play it safe. The best advice is not to.

W&H: What advice do you have for other female directors?

Rd: Don’t try to ape anyone else. Embrace what makes you unique. Don’t be afraid of being “soft,” and god knows don’t be afraid of bringing emotion into your filmmaking. No film is objective, and the more you can infuse your work with your particular perspective on the world, the stronger it will be.

W&H: Name your favorite woman-directed film and why.

Rd: I thought Kirsten Johnson’s “Cameraperson” was a masterpiece. She exposes her own aching heart, embraces her own subjectivity as a filmmaker, and ultimately makes a film that is a love poem to the documentary as an art form. It’s hard to imagine that film having been made by a man.

W&H: There have been significant conversations over the last couple of years about increasing the amount of opportunities for women directors yet the numbers have not increased. Are you optimistic about the possibilities for change? Share any thoughts you might have on this topic.

Rd: There’s clearly going to be a tipping point and we’re not there yet, but I have a lot of faith that we will be. Change takes longer than it should. The revelations about sexual abuse and harassment in Hollywood are part of a growing movement of women finding their voices and speaking up. The outcome will be more women directors, more women cinematographers, more women editors, more women everything.

Doc NYC 2017 Women Directors: Meet Rachel Dretzin — “Far From the Tree” was originally published in Women and Hollywood on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.
See full article at Women and Hollywood »

New Class of Women at Sundance Fellows Announced

Ramona Diaz is part of the new class: Sundance

Marielle Heller (“The Diary of a Teenage Girl”), Elyse Steinberg (“Weiner”), and Jennifer Phang (“Advantageous”) are just a few of the amazing alumna of the Women at Sundance Fellows program. The Sundance Institute has announced the sixth annual class of its year-long fellowship, which includes mentorship, personal coaching, travel grants to participate in activities at Sundance Film Fest, and other forms of support.

The six women chosen to participate are “emerging and mid-career narrative and documentary directors and producers, selected from a pool of recent Sundance Institute alumnae.”

This year’s fellows include Ramona Diaz, director of “Motherland,” a doc about the world’s busiest maternity hospital, and Eliza Hittman, writer-director of “Beach Rats,” a drama about a Brooklyn teen exploring his sexuality. When Hittman won Sundance’s U.S. drama directing award for the film she said, “I think there is nothing more taboo in this country than a woman with ambition, and I am going to work my way through a system that is completely discriminatory towards women. And Hollywood, I’m coming for you.”

Check out all of the fellows and their bios below, courtesy of Sundance.

Ramona Diaz is an award-winning Asian-American filmmaker best known for her compelling character-driven documentaries that combine a profound appreciation for cinematic aesthetics and potent storytelling. Her films have demonstrated her ability to gain intimate access to the people she films — be they rock stars, first ladies, dissidents, teachers or mothers — resulting in keenly observed moments and nuanced narratives. While she has focused exclusively on stories of Filipinos and Filipino Americans, the themes of Ramona’s stories are universal. Her films have screened and won awards at Sundance, the Berlinale, Tribeca, Silverdocs, Idfa, and many other top-tier film festivals. She has received funding from Itvs, Caam, Sundance Documentary Fund, MacArthur Foundation, Tribeca Institute, Catapult Film Fund, and Chicken & Egg, among others. All four of Ramona’s feature length films — Imelda, The Learning, Don’t Stop Believin’: Everyman’s Journey, and Motherland — have broadcast on either Pov or Independent Lens on PBS. She has also served on numerous film festival juries and funding panels. For the past four years, Ramona has been a film envoy for the American Film Showcase, a joint program of the U.S. Department of State and the USC School of Cinematic Arts that brings American films to audiences worldwide. She has conducted master classes and production and post-production workshops all over the world, including in Iraq, Laos, Morocco, Qatar, Zimbabwe, the Congo and throughout the United States. Recently, she was awarded the prestigious Guggenheim Fellowship and was inducted into the Academy of Motion Picture Arts & Sciences.

Sabrina Schmidt Gordon is an award-winning documentary filmmaker from New York City. Her editing debut won an Emmy for Wgbh’s Greater Boston Arts series, and she has continued to distinguish herself as a producer, editor, and director. Her latest film, Quest, premiered at the Sundance Film Festival in January 2017. It has won Grand Jury prizes at several festivals, including the Full Frame Documentary Film Festival, where it also won the Human Rights award. Her feature debut as a producer and editor, Hip-Hop: Beyond Beats and Rhymes, also premiered at Sundance, in 2006, and was named in the Chicago Tribune’s “Best Documentaries of 2007.” In 2015, Sabrina co-produced/directed, and edited BaddDDD Sonia Sanchez. It received an Emmy nomination for Outstanding Culture and Arts documentary, and won the Best Film Directed by a Woman of Color award at the African Diaspora International Film Festival. Sabrina is also the co-producer and editor of Documented, the story of Pulitzer Prize-winning undocumented journalist, Jose Antonio Vargas. The film had record viewership on CNN, with over a billion impressions on Twitter, generated Oscar buzz, and was nominated for the NAACP Image Award for Best Documentary Film. Her television credits include The New Mad Men, which won the Imagen Award for Best National Informational Program for Maria Hinojosa’s acclaimed PBS series, America by the Numbers. Sabrina also creates content for organizations and video journalism platforms. Among these are The Ford Foundation, Frontline, The New York Times, The Atlantic, Witness, American Masters, the Center for Constitutional Rights, Agricultural Missions, the National Campaign to Restore Civil Rights, and more. Her commitment to social justice extends to consulting on and producing engagement and impact campaigns for media projects. Sabrina is on the faculty at the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism and the Cuny Graduate School of Journalism. She is co-chair of the Black Documentary Collective and serves on many media panels and juries. She is an honors graduate from New York University.

Eliza Hittman is an award-winning filmmaker, born and based in Brooklyn, New York. Her debut feature film It Felt Like Lovepremiered at the Sundance Film Festival in Next and the International Film Festival Rotterdam in the Tiger Competition in 2013. It was a New York Times, The Village Voice, and Los Angeles Times Critics’ Pick. She was named one of Filmmaker Magazine’s 25 New Faces of Indie Film. She was nominated for a Bingham Ray Breakthrough Director Gotham Award and two Independent Spirit Awards for It Felt Like Love, Best Cinematography and the John Cassavetes Award. Her second feature, Beach Rats was selected for the Sundance Screenwriters Lab and premiered in U.S. Dramatic Competition at the 2017 Sundance Film Festival, where she was given the Directing Award. The film was the Centerpiece film at New Director’s New Films and premiered internationally at Locarno. She is an Assistant Professor of Film/Video at Pratt Institute.

Angela C. Lee is a Spirit Award nominated producer dedicated to creating bold and captivating stories that promote empathy and exploration. Her first feature film Songs My Brothers Taught Me, premiered in competition at the Sundance Film Festival and Directors’ Fortnight at Cannes. The film was distributed by Kino Lorber and nominated for multiple Spirit Awards including Best First Feature and Best Cinematography. Angela is currently in post-production on the fiction short The Row, commissioned by Indigenous Media through their Project Her Incubator and in development on fiction feature projects The Space Between, about a woman obsessed with becoming a professional bodybuilder, and Sparkle Panthers, a comedy set in the arena of eSports and multi-player online gaming. She is a 2015 Sundance Institute Creative Producing Lab Fellow and has also been supported by the Berlinale Talents and Co-Production Market, Film Independent, Ifp, PGA Diversity Workshop and the Center for Asian American Media. Angela is also the Senior Manager of Artist Development at Film Independent where she oversees the filmmaker labs program including Screenwriting, Directing, Producing, Episodic, Documentary Labs and the Fast Track Finance Market. Previously, Angela served as Director of Creative Affairs at Vox3 Films in New York. Prior to her career in entertainment, she was an Associate at Goldman Sachs. Angela currently serves as Co-President of DragonSprouts, a 501(c)3 organization that supports Mandarin Immersion language programs in the La Unified School District. A native Chicagoan now based in Los Angeles, Angela graduated from the University of Chicago with a degree in Economics.

Lana Wilson is an Emmy Award-winning director, writer, and producer based in New York. Her new film, The Departure, premiered in competition at the 2017 Tribeca Film Festival to critical acclaim. The Departure was called “A genuinely spiritual experience” by The Washington Post, “Stunning” by Filmmaker Magazine, and “Tender and quietly moving…like a haiku” by TheNew York Times. The film had a held-over New York theatrical run at Metrograph, and is now playing in additional select Us cities. Wilson’s first film, After Tiller, premiered at Sundance in 2013 and went on to win an Emmy Award for Best Documentary. It was also nominated for an Independent Spirit Award, four Cinema Eye Honors, and the Ridenhour Prize. After Tiller was theatrically released in 50 Us cities by Oscilloscope and nationally broadcast on Pov. It was named one of the five best documentaries of the year by the National Board of Review and featured in “Best of 2013” lists in the La Times, the Village Voice, Indiewire, Artforum, and more. Wilson has also worked in television, including writing and producing the premiere episode of the documentary miniseries I Am Rebel for National Geographic Studios. Previously, Wilson was the Film and Dance Curator for Performa. Wilson is a Visiting Assistant Professor at Pratt and has also taught at UnionDocs and Dctv. Her work has been supported by the Sundance Documentary Fund, Itvs, Candescent Films, Artemis Rising Foundation, Chicken & Egg Pictures, the Tribeca Film Institute, the Ida, Nysca, and the MacDowell Colony. She holds a B.A. in Film Studies and Dance from Wesleyan University.

Lauren Wolkstein is a New York City-based filmmaker originally from Baltimore, Maryland. Her award-winning short films include Social Butterfly (2013 Sundance Film Festival), Cigarette Candy (2010 SXSW Grand Jury Prize) and The Strange Ones co-directed with Christopher Radcliff (2011 Sundance Film Festival). Lauren and Christopher adapted The Strange Ones into their first feature film of the same name, starring James Freedson-Jackson and Alex Pettyfer, which world premiered to critical acclaim at the SXSW Film Festival in 2017, receiving the Jury Award for Best Breakthrough Performance. It had its international premiere at the Champs-Élysées Film Festival where it took home the Grand Jury Prize for Best American Independent Feature Film. Vertical Entertainment and DirecTV picked it up for distribution and it will be released theatrically in January 2018. Lauren also recently completed collective:unconscious, a collaborative feature spearheaded by Dan Schoenbrun, which was the first omnibus to premiere in the Narrative Feature Competition at SXSW in 2016. Filmmaker Magazine listed her as one of the “25 New Faces of Independent Film” in 2013. Lauren received her Mfa in film directing from Columbia University and is an assistant professor of Film and Media Arts at Temple University. Wolkstein is currently developing a project about a female player in the male-dominated world of high stakes poker.

New Class of Women at Sundance Fellows Announced was originally published in Women and Hollywood on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.
See full article at Women and Hollywood »

Istanbul Stray Cats Film ‘Kedi’ Leads Critics’ Choice Documentary Nominations

Istanbul Stray Cats Film ‘Kedi’ Leads Critics’ Choice Documentary Nominations
The Broadcast Film Critics Assn. (Bfca) and Broadcast Television Journalists Assn. (Btja) jointly announced the nominees for the second annual Critics’ Choice Documentary Awards Monday.

Leading the nominations with four was “Kedi,” a Turkish chronicle of the stray cats of Istanbul directed by Ceyda Torun.

“The inaugural event last year was such a fantastic night, we cannot wait to celebrate the leading lights in the doc world at our second annual event,” said Bfca president Joey Berlin. “This is a golden age for documentary filmmaking and nonfiction television and we’re proud to help audiences find the best of the best.”

California Typewriter,” “Chasing Coral,” “City of Ghosts,” “Cries From Syria,” and “Dawson City: Frozen Time” all picked up multiple nominations.

Oscar- and Emmy-nominated filmmaker Joe Berlinger (“Paradise Lost” Trilogy, “Metallica: Some Kind of Monster”) will receive the Critics’ Choice Impact Award.

One rule change of note this year: There is no longer a distinction between theatrical
See full article at Variety - Film News »

People Turn Their Backs on Trump Surrogate Omarosa During Heated Panel at Journalist Convention

People Turn Their Backs on Trump Surrogate Omarosa During Heated Panel at Journalist Convention
Omarosa Manigault found herself in some hot water at the National Association of Black Journalists conference in New Orleans on Friday.

Heated words, walk-outs and turned backs were as much part of the conference as the questions leveled at Manigault — whom many thought was dodging serious questions about President Donald Trump and his attitude about police brutality, NPR reported.

“I’ll do my best to try to keep this a civil as possible,” broadcast journalist and fellow panelist Ed Gordon said in a video clip of the panel, shared by a Twitter user. “Don’t be aggressive,” Manigault responded, as she stood up.
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

How the Alex Jones Debacle Has Exposed NBC’s $18 Million Megyn Kelly Problem

  • Indiewire
Megyn Kelly is damaged goods, and it’s surprising that NBC News only now realizes it.

Here’s the problem: Kelly doesn’t quite have a place in these highly partisan times, and her early “gets” with Vladimir Putin and Alex Jones don’t change that. The Left is still disgusted over her race-baiting reports on Fox News over the years. (NewsOne has helpfully chosen her “10 most racist moments” here.) The Right now sees her as a traitor, heading to NBC in a bid to go mainstream.

NBC should have known this wouldn’t be easy, but instead of working on an image rehab, the network threw her to the wolves with Putin and Jones. Simply showing up at NBC and saying (wink-wink) now I can be a real journalist doesn’t make that baggage go away.

It ought to have been no surprise that re-entering the hornet’s nest might sting.
See full article at Indiewire »

Newswire: 13th, O.J.: Made In America top this year’s Peabody documentary winners

It’s a good day for pretty much everybody in the documentary business, as the winners of this year’s batch of documentary Peabody Awards come from a wide array of studios and filmmakers. This comes from Deadline, which reports that the biggest names in the list are Ava DuVernay’s American criminal-justice system deconstruction 13th, Espn’s Oscar-winning O.J. Simpson film O.J.: Made In America, and Alex Gibney’s cyber warfare-based political thriller Zero Days. There are also two Frontline specials from PBS, two non-Frontline specials from PBS, HBO’s Mavis Staples doc Mavis!, and Audrie & Daisy and Hip-Hop Evolution from Netflix.

The winners of the other entertainment Peabody Awards will be announced later this week, and you can see the full list of documentary winners below.

2017 Peabody Award Documentary Winners

Audrie & Daisy

4.1 Miles

Frontline: “Confronting Isis”

Frontline: “Exodus”

Hip-Hop Evolution ...
See full article at The AV Club »

Peabody Awards: ‘O.J.: Made In America, ‘13th’, ‘Zero Days’ Among Documentary Winners

Oscar winner O.J.: Made In America, Ava DuVernay’s criminal justice docu 13th and Alex Gibney’s cyber warfare pic Zero Days are among the 12 winners of Peabody Awards for documentaries. PBS scored four of the 12 spots, with Frontline pieces on Isis and the refugee crisis, Independent Lens: Trapped and Pov: Hooligan Sparrow. Netflix, which has ramped up its documentary slate considerably in the past year, has three titles on the list: Audrie & Daisy, DuVernay’s…
See full article at Deadline TV »

Peabody Awards: ‘O.J.: Made In America, ‘13th’, ‘Zero Days’ Among Documentary Winners

Peabody Awards: ‘O.J.: Made In America, ‘13th’, ‘Zero Days’ Among Documentary Winners
Oscar winner O.J.: Made In America, Ava DuVernay’s criminal justice docu 13th and Alex Gibney’s cyber warfare pic Zero Days are among the 12 winners of Peabody Awards for documentaries. PBS scored four of the 12 spots, with Frontline pieces on Isis and the refugee crisis, Independent Lens: Trapped and Pov: Hooligan Sparrow. Netflix, which has ramped up its documentary slate considerably in the past year, has three titles on the list: Audrie & Daisy, DuVernay’s…
See full article at Deadline »

‘Fargo’ and ‘Veep’ are Back, Plus More TV You Must See This Week

Ewan McGregor in ‘Fargo

Two of the best series on television return this week as HBO brings back Veep and FX debuts another season of Fargo. Additionally, there are anticipated fiction and nonfiction shows as well as a new HBO biopic we’re excited about, at the same time we’re set to say goodbye to other favorites, either for the year or forever. To help you keep track of the most important programs over the next seven days, here’s our guide to everything worth watching, whether it’s on broadcast, cable, or streaming for April 16–22:

(All listed times are Eastern)

SUNDAYVeep (HBO, 10:30pm)

This show is back for the first time since the election, and fans are surely wondering how the political humor will reflect the new administration. Probably not at all, considering it was never a reaction to current events before. Instead, the focus on the first episode of season six, “Omaha
See full article at FilmSchoolRejects »

Donald Glover’s ‘Atlanta’, Beyonce’s ‘Lemonade’ Among Peabody Awards Finalists

Donald Glover’s ‘Atlanta’, Beyonce’s ‘Lemonade’ Among Peabody Awards Finalists
Beyonce’s visual album “Lemonade” and Donald Glover’s freshman FX series “Atlanta” were among the finalists for the 76th Annual Peabody Awards, the Peabody Awards Board of Jurors announced Wednesday.

Other notable finalists this year include the first season of the Marvel-Netflix series “Luke Cage,” which stars Mike Colter as a man with superhuman strength and impenetrable skin, and Ava DuVernay’s Oscar-nominated documentary “13th,” which explores racial issues within the U.S. prison system.

The full list of finalists below represents the 60 finalists that represent the most compelling and empowering stories released in electronic media during 2016. Over the next several weeks, the awards organizers will winnow that list down to 30 winning programs. Peabody Award winners and finalists will be celebrated at a gala event on May 20 in New York. The event will be taped for a television special to air on both PBS and Fusion networks on June 2 at 9 p.
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Film Review: ‘2017 Oscar Nominated Short Films: Documentary’

Film Review: ‘2017 Oscar Nominated Short Films: Documentary’
The Academy has a strange idea of “best” when it comes to documentary shorts. Rather than celebrating innovation and artistry in this particular category, the organization’s nonfiction branch nearly always gravitates toward the mini-movies (40 minutes or less) that tackle the Big Issues — which this year include the crisis in Syria, immigration woes in southern Europe, the uneasy question of euthanasia, and, of course, the Holocaust. Should future historians want to gauge where the Academy’s political sentiments lay any given year, they need only analyze this category, which might more accurately be called “most important documentary short.” For film fans catching up with the nominees in cinemas or on-demand at home, the program makes for a downbeat but illuminating 2½-hour marathon.

In what feels like an incredibly polished infomercial for Wqxr’s instrument drive, “Joe’s Violin” combines two Big Issues in one: Joseph Feingold is a charitable Holocaust
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Writers Guild Awards 2017: Complete Winners List!

Let's hear it for the writers!

The Writer's Guild of America held their annual awards show on Sunday night at the Beverly Hilton in Los Angeles, where Barry Jenkins' Moonlight, The People vs. O.J. Simpson: American Crime Story, Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt, and Donald Glover's breakout series, Atlanta were among those recognized for their achievement of the written word.

Read on below to see the full list of winners.

More: John Legend, Justin Timberlake and Lin-Manuel Miranda Among 2017 Oscars Performers

Film Winners

Original Screenplay

Moonlight, Screenplay by Barry Jenkins, Story by Tarell Alvin McCraney; A24

Adapted Screenplay

Arrival, Screenplay by Eric Heisserer; Based on the Story “Story of Your Life” by Ted Chiang; Paramount Pictures

Documentary Screenplay

Command and Control, Telescript by Robert Kenner & Eric Schlosser, Story by Brian Pearle and Kim Roberts; Based on the book Command and Control by Eric Schlosser; American Experience Films

Television And New Media Winners

Drama Series

The Americans, Written
See full article at Entertainment Tonight »

Writers Guild Award Analysis: It’s Still ‘Moonlight’ and ‘Manchester’ At the Oscars

Writers Guild Award Analysis: It’s Still ‘Moonlight’ and ‘Manchester’ At the Oscars
The Writers Guild Awards and the Academy writing nominees always don’t line up; many films are ineligible. This year, those included Oscar-writing nominees “Lion” and “The Lobster.”

This year, the WGA and the Academy differed dramatically. While the WGA deemed “Moonlight” and “Loving” as Original Screenplays, the Academy considered both as Adapted; only “Moonlight” landed a nomination.

At the WGA, as at the BAFTAs, Barry Jenkins’ script for “Moonlight” competed for the Original Screenplay Award against both Kenneth Lonergan’s “Manchester by the Sea” and Damien Chazelle’s “La La Land.” Unlike the BAFTAs, Jenkins emerged the winner over Lonergan, a sign of strength for “Moonlight,” which is nominated for eight Oscars.

Read More: Yes, Damien Chazelle’s ‘La La Land’ Really Will Win Director and Picture Oscars — Here’s Why

However, in the Oscars’ Original Screenplay contest, lauded playwright and Oscar-nominated screenwriter Lonergan (“You Can Count On Me,
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